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Metro's new voice

That new voice you may hear in Metro stations is brought to you courtesy of the Department of Homeland Security.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is the voice of a new public awareness message aimed at heightening the awareness of passengers who use the transit system. The Post's Ed O'Keefe reports on his Federal Eye blog that the effort is part of the national "If you see something, say something" campaign. Napolitano unveiled that effort in July.

O'Keefe reports that Washington is the first city to use the message, which will be localized for other systems. For the complete report, and a video, visit the Federal Eye blog.

By Michael Bolden  | October 8, 2010; 12:12 PM ET
Categories:  Metro  
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Comments

Is she planning on running in an election somewhere? How odd it is, that she'd spend the time, as a Security Chief, on a "Public Announcement".

Posted by: Hattrik | October 8, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

I wonder if they tried the same thing under Chertoff, but his voice scared children so they canned it.

Posted by: Xeus | October 8, 2010 12:46 PM | Report abuse

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