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Posted at 6:04 PM ET, 12/ 7/2010

DC-295 speed cameras are gone

By Derek Kravitz

The DC-295 work zone speed cameras are gone.

The mobile camera units, which had been stationed near the new Eastern Avenue Bridge in July to help protect workers from speeding vehicles, were taken away last week, D.C. Assistant Police Chief Patrick Burke said.

The District Department of Transportation said the cameras were removed either Thursday or Friday. The Washington Post ran an article about their usage on Friday.

Nearly 15,000 speeding tickets were generated by cameras in the work zone, near the Maryland border, between mid-August, when ticketing began after a monthlong grace period, and the end of October, according to police statistics. Most construction work on the bridge ended in October and construction reports that month showed work was expected to be wrapped up entirely by Oct. 19.

DDOT officials said they still had signage in the area and work left to perform in November. Several drivers are contesting their speeding tickets in court, arguing that the speed cameras were left up too long after the lion's share of construction ended, according to a spokesman for AAA Mid-Atlantic.

Graphic: D.C. speed cameras

Related stories:

Drivers on 295 won't cameras to go

By Derek Kravitz  | December 7, 2010; 6:04 PM ET
Categories:  District, Driving  
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Comments

If they issued 15,000 tickets when the cameras were operating, I would hate to think how they will drive now that there are no cameras...Be careful what u ask for!!!!!!

Glad I live in Va. and have no need to take 295...and if so, will gladly find an alt. route....

Posted by: pentagon40 | December 7, 2010 7:12 PM | Report abuse

If they issued 15,000 tickets when the cameras were operating, I would hate to think how they will drive now that there are no cameras...Be careful what u ask for!!!!!!

Glad I live in Va. and have no need to take 295...and if so, will gladly find an alt. route....

Posted by: pentagon40
-------------------------------------------

No need to worry. As a matter of fact, the cameras were overkill since it's impossible to drive at a dangerous rate of speed on the section of 295 in question. Something to do with what is called the laws of physics. Borrow a high school textboook if you don't believe me.

Posted by: ceefer66 | December 7, 2010 11:36 PM | Report abuse

Considering the fact that in South Carolina only 1% of all total Crashes were ever caused by speeding: http://www.banthecams.org/20101202676/Ridgeland-will-try-to-justify-speed-cameras.html
also see: http://www.scdps.org/ohs/2007%20FACTBOOK.pdf page 11 of the adobe printout!

It is not hard to figure out this was about money.

Further let me add the British did a study a few years ago (and HID IT!) that proved the speed SCAMERA casued more wrecks. http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/06/602.asp

They keep talking about "protecting" workers yet more workers are KILLED by their OWN vehicles than motorists! http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/07/729.asp

Fight the SCAM!

Ban the Cams!

www.motorists.org
www.banthecams.org
www.camerafraud.com
www.bancams.com

also see anti camera site: http://www.stopbigbrothermd.org/

Posted by: donaldson1 | December 8, 2010 11:00 AM | Report abuse

I think it's an insult to the workers that people are contesting these tickets.

Posted by: YoDave | December 8, 2010 1:35 PM | Report abuse

I think that this has shown that the professional traffic safety personnel - police department and transportation department - were on top of this situation all along. But 15,000 violations were far too many.

Posted by: RobertM468 | December 8, 2010 3:35 PM | Report abuse

I have been following this. I think this is a good solution.

Posted by: gordon514 | December 8, 2010 9:20 PM | Report abuse

If these people were going over the posted speed limit, wheter workers were present or not, they broke the law and the only ones at fault are the drivers. Not the cameras. Pay your fine and realize that speed limits are not a suggestion. Stupidity the result of relativism.

Posted by: beatduke10 | December 9, 2010 1:43 AM | Report abuse

If 15,000 tickets were issued in such a short period of time, we definitely need to make these cameras permanent! That's an outrageous number of drivers breaking the law...geesh!

Posted by: MargoPolo1983 | December 9, 2010 7:29 PM | Report abuse

whoa, 15,000 is a pretty high number! If there were really that many people speeding, then maybe the cameras should have stayed!

Posted by: Loopla | December 10, 2010 12:06 PM | Report abuse

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