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Posted at 3:26 PM ET, 12/14/2010

Va. man accused in Metro bomb threat

By Maria Glod

An Arlington man has been arrested after posting on Facebook that he could put pipe bombs on Metro cars or in Georgetown at rush hour, according to a criminal complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Alexandria.

Court papers do not show that Awais Younis, 25, also known as Mohhanme Khan and Sundullah Ghilzai, ever acted on the threats. He has been charged with communicating threats via interstate communications.

In late November, someone told FBI agents in New Orleans that a person they had met via Facebook had chatted about using explosives in the D.C. area, court papers say. The person, known as Sundullah Ghilzai, described how to build a pipe bomb and indicated what type of shrapnel would cause the most damage.

Ghilzai said he could put a pipe bomb under a sewer head in Georgetown at rush hour to cause the greatest number of casualties, according to an affidavit filed in court by the FBI. He also talked about putting bombs on the third and fifth Metro cars, which he said held the largest number of passengers.

Younis's arrest came the same week that a 21-year old Baltimore man was accused in a plot to bomb a military recruiting center.

Antonio Martinez, 21, who recently converted to Islam and changed his name to Muhammad Hussain, is accused of trying to kill members of the military whom he saw as a threat to Muslims. The FBI learned of his radical leanings on Facebook, joined his plot and supplied him with a fake car bomb that he tried to detonate, federal officials said.

And in October, authorities charged Farooque Ahmed, 34, of Ashburn with conspiring with people he thought to be al-Qaeda operatives to bomb the Arlington Cemetery, Pentagon City, Crystal City and Court House Metro stations.The operatives were actually working with the FBI.

By Maria Glod  | December 14, 2010; 3:26 PM ET
Categories:  Metro  
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Comments

So isn't his name Muhammad Hussain rather than the name the writer posted?

Posted by: washingtonpost819 | December 14, 2010 3:50 PM | Report abuse

I don't really appreciate the Washington Post publishing helpful hints at how to kill and maim the most people.

Posted by: getjiggly1 | December 14, 2010 3:54 PM | Report abuse

We need to start getting serious with these "would be terrorists" that are naturalized citizens. Any non-native born US citizen convicted of terrorist related offenses should be stripped of their US citizenship.

At the same time, their immediate family (father, mother, sisters, brothers, children) should also be stripped of their citizenship and immediately deported to their country of origin. No appeal.... (The only exception would be families who reported their family members terrorist activities in time to stop a major incident.) Why would they want to maintain their US citizenship anyway when they are trying to destroy the country? Maybe the families would start paying more attention to what is happening and stop something before it happens...

Posted by: dbmn1 | December 14, 2010 4:35 PM | Report abuse

dbmn1

So what if they are native born would be terrorist. Should their family members pay for their crimes based on their origin?

Posted by: ged0386 | December 14, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

So far the majority of these "home-grown terrorists" have been naturalized citizens. On conviction, or death in a terrorist incident, they and their families need to be stripped of their citizenship in this country they apparently hate and immediately deported to their country of origin. Few U.S. born citizens are involved in this type of activity so far. Further, a natural born citizen has no other country of origin we can ship them to.

Posted by: dbmn1 | December 14, 2010 4:56 PM | Report abuse

I am sick of the protection of immigrants--naturalized citizens or not--who try and harm U.S. citizens. This extends from illegal aliens who are a scourge on the economy -- YES! A SCOURGE ON THE ECONOMY -- to those like this bunch of idiots, and they aren't the first!, who are naturalized and STILL hate Americans.

The other night, some news show featured an immigrant's daughter who was screwed and pimped by her father, a naturalized American. The show ended with: Americans DO sell their Children as Sex Slaves. Yeah? Like who? Nobody I know.

Political correctness has gone too far and is ruining the country. There is too much immigration, too much leniency on illegal aliens, and too many visa holders who take Americans' jobs.

Posted by: woof3 | December 14, 2010 5:02 PM | Report abuse

So let me get this straight. This guy is guilty of saying stuff? And the stuff that he said that got him arrested is the same stuff that you just said? Ok.

Posted by: troethke | December 14, 2010 5:03 PM | Report abuse

Someone needs to crack down on these crazed Buddhists immediately.

Posted by: zippyspeed | December 14, 2010 5:03 PM | Report abuse

Yes, let's institute collective punishment. That will do the trick. And since George W. Bush decided the Geneva Conventions no longer apply to the United States, it won't be a problem that collective punishment is a violation of the 4th Geneva Convention, which the U.S. signed, and is a war crime.

Clearly, dbmn1 is a neo-con/Republigoon.

Posted by: B-rod | December 14, 2010 5:06 PM | Report abuse

Think about it now

An individual committing terrorist acts against this country clearly hates this country. Why should he or his immediate family keep their citizenship? The other reason for the collective punishment of the family is that perhaps the family who worked hard to gain citizenship will take more interest in what their children are doing that might bring harm to this country.

Also, if the terrorist knows that his younger sisters/brothers or children are going to be deported back to wonderful Somalia or some other great place like that - perhaps things may go just a little differently.

Posted by: dbmn1 | December 14, 2010 5:11 PM | Report abuse

A policy of mandatory forced deportations of innocent citizens isn't going to get us very far. Sure, it will make the US less attractive to people suffering under that sort of government in the first place. But that's a bit like buying the sh*ttiest possible car so no one would be tempted to break into it. No, thanks.

Look, there is a legal way to do what you propose. First you have to establish legal liability among the family members. Then they can be subject to civil or criminal charges and sued, jailed, deported, whatever the law allows.

But even that is a slippery slope away from directing punishment the only place it belongs--at the wrongdoer.

Posted by: Godfather_of_Goals | December 14, 2010 5:46 PM | Report abuse

Maria Glod is going to prison.

Posted by: getjiggly1 | December 14, 2010 5:49 PM | Report abuse

Does anybody know how I could win the pitchfork concession around here? Because every time I check the comment sections all I read are a bunch of excitable idiots who are willing to throw out the Constitution, the Bill Of Rights, the Jury System, etc. to counteract thier percieved outrage of the moment. "George Huguely's lawyers negotiating a plea." "STRING HIM UP!" "Va. Man Accused In Metro Bomb Threat." "STRING HIM AND HIS FAMILY UP!"

dbmn1, your idea is truly one of the most idiotic and un- American I have heard. Do you really want to live in a country where a person's next of kin is deported or punished because of the actions of thier family member? I sure hope you don't have kids!

Posted by: David90 | December 14, 2010 5:59 PM | Report abuse

Any organization that promotes sedition is not protected by the Constitution. And that includes religious organizations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedition

Posted by: johnnyboston | December 14, 2010 6:00 PM | Report abuse

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