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Albert Haynesworth: Is he worth the drama?

Updated at 10:30 a.m.

Albert Haynesworth is playing a game of chicken with Redskins Coach Mike Shanahan, Sally Jenkins writes. But does the possibility of a strong, motivated Haynesworth make all these headlines tolerable? Can his career with the Redskins be salvaged?

A time and place for 'Hail to the Redskins'

The Redskins band played "Hail to the Redskins" after a Ravens touchdown Saturday night, and even the players noticed. ("Why was HTTR song played when the opponent scored? Not good," Phillip Daniels tweeted.) That prompted some fan outrage (at a 6 on the Haynesworthian scale of 1-10), an admission by the team that it was "a mistake," and a fan exchange on Twitter.

Jeff Beardsley tweets: Larger issue is one [Dan Steinberg] touched on - they play HTTR CONSTANTLY through the game the past few years. Must. Stop.

Adrian Moore: What's wrong with playing HTTR during timeouts? Better than "Not Afraid" or "I Gotta Feeling".

Beardsley: I always thought that's what "welcome to the jungle" was for. :)

Brett Sower: It detracts from the special nature of the song. It should only be played after the #Redskins score.

SuperSkin: I had to cover my ears with my cape when the fight song blunder occured. It felt like a vulcan mind meld. Absurd.

Question No. 2: Strasburg's arm

Tom Boswell makes a compelling case: The Nationals should end Stephen Strasburg's season right now, regardless of what the team reveals about his MRI this morning.

And then there's Favre ...

For a guy who played for only four of the 10 plays his coach said were a possibility, Brett Favre had a lot to talk about.

The return of Brett Lorenzo Favre (as Al Michaels reminded in the happily coincidental of a nationally telecast game) from a retirement that never got any loft had it all: a nice 13-yard completion, a scary sack, lengthy interviews on his relationship with his teammates and Coach Brad Childress.

"I didn't fumble a snap, completed a pass,'' Favre said afterward. "That's a win for me."

All that was missing was the soul-crushing interception.

Childress spoke after the game with Peter King for the Monday Morning Quarterback column about his role in Favre's decision to play. He's totally cool about the notion that he did some begging.

"There are no sacrosanct rules in this business. You do what you have to do to win, and I've got no problem with that. You can't get a hit if you don't swing the bat.''

And that includes sending three players to Hattiesburg, Miss.

"The hardest thing we had to do, the hardest thing by far, was getting him down that long driveway in Hattiesburg,'' Childress said. "Once we got him to go down that long driveway, we had him. He was in.''

King on firing of Bolno

After the Redskins' firing of Zack Bolno, universally considered one of the best in the business of sports, King chronicled the Redskins' public relations directors in the Daniel Snyder era. Short version: the Redskins have had seven since 2000; the Giants, Cowboys and Eagles have had three among them. They've also had 10 division titles among them.

PR guys don't win games. But PR guys in the NFL cannot and never have been able to put lipstick on pigs. Bolno cannot make the Washington Post and LaVar Arrington write and say nice things about a team that's gone 70-90 in the past 10 years and spent money on a multitude of the wrong players.

Recall? What recall?

My breakfast every morning: a plate of oatmeal with blueberries, followed by 4 eggs over easy mixed with toast. Then 3 hard boiled eggs.less than a minute ago via Twitter for BlackBerry®

Tweet of the weekend

Just had a nice dinner finished off with fruit to cleanse the colon.less than a minute ago via Snaptu.com

By Cindy Boren  |  August 23, 2010; 7:38 AM ET
Categories:  Brett Favre , NFL , Nationals , Redskins , Stephen Strasburg  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Live chat: Redskins-Ravens
Next: Donovan McNabb in walking boot; Haynesworth declines comment

Comments

As usual, the Post starts racketing up the Haynesworth Hate Meter. From the tape, Haynesworth spoke calmly and respectfully, yet it is characterized as going on a rant and an attack on the Washington Redskins (stadium and all no doubt). Time for the Post writers to head back to journalism school, I think. And not the one that teaches yellow journalism.

Posted by: Nemo24601 | August 23, 2010 8:53 AM | Report abuse

Firing of Zack Bolno shows that The Danny still needs to be The Danny. The Redskins will still lead the league in turmoil and drama, but not in wins.

Posted by: dcborn61 | August 23, 2010 9:00 AM | Report abuse

What must it be like to be a Redskins employee? Snyder has such a history of how he deals with people, from nannies to ticket salespeople to club seat ticketholders stretched beyond their means to head coaches. If you are afraid for your job, you can't do well. Not encouraged that this organization will every become a consistent winner with this owner.

Posted by: dcborn61 | August 23, 2010 9:17 AM | Report abuse

Albert Haynesworth: Is he worth the drama?

If by drama you mean the congealed sweat and residue left in my jock after a run and workout - naaaah, he's not.

Posted by: overed | August 23, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

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