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Rex Ryan 'here to cooperate' in Ines Sainz investigation

Updated at 10:23 a.m.

It was either luck or misfortune that Rex Ryan's comments about the New York Jets and the Ines Sainz incident were overtaken by Clinton Portis: the comments and the apology.

NFL officials paid the Jets a visit Tuesday as part of their investigation into allegations that Sainz, a TV Azteca reporter, was harassed during practice and in the locker room.

"Again, I think everyone knows me well enough and we want to have an environment here where everyone is comfortable," Ryan said. "I don't know all the specifics of what is going on. The NFL is here, I can tell you that today. They are here investigating. We're open. Whoever the NFL wants to talk to -- I'm not sure who it is -- but we'll let that play out.

"We're here to cooperate."

Sainz continued her talk-show tour.

***

Because the caretaker of this blog is a woman and a sports journalist (I feel like Doug Williams when I'm asked about that) and a sports journalist who once had a blow dryer thrown at her for no good reason in a locker room, I've been getting tons of questions about how I view the Ines Sainz incident and Clinton Portis' comments. So here's the Cliff's Notes version. You can listen to my interview with Dan Levy here.

I'm sympathetic to the issues on both sides. The locker room isn't a Playboy Mansion for players nor is it Chippendale's for women reporters. It's a place to which women need equal access in order to do their jobs. It's a place for reporters and players to show mutual respect as everyone works. I respect that players may be uncomfortable; God knows I am. But I'm doing my work and getting the heck out of there as quickly as I can. I respect that athletes may not want women in the locker room; they are entitled to that opinion and that must not color my work in anyway. And women reporters should respect players by dressing appropriately; conversely, it wouldn't kill athletes to wear a towel during open locker rooms. As awkward as the situation can be, rules dictate that locker rooms must be open for all the media. Honestly, I really thought this issue was settled decades ago.

Dan Steinberg's take on locker room access is at DC Sports Bog.

By Cindy Boren  |  September 15, 2010; 8:14 AM ET
Categories:  NFL  
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Comments

Great insight, Cindy! Thanks for sharing.

I'd like to raise a practical question at this point. I'm not being rhetorical, so please indulge me:

Why do we need locker room interviews at all? Is there anything covered there that isn't in the press room?

I don't see why you would need to perform your job in a manner that would require you to "get the heck out of there" unless there was some good reason.

On the other side, Sainz's game is based on sexual tension and innuendo. How can you complain about getting trampled when you yell fire in a crowded theatre?

Posted by: DikShuttle | September 15, 2010 9:35 AM | Report abuse

Who were the players and team personnel that said something to her? What did they actually say? Who are the media reps who said they felt bad for her? There are a lot of facts missing from this story. I find it disturbing that responsibility in journalism now takes a back seat to sensationalism. At this point, with no facts to back up her story, Sainz is less than credible for me. Her actions and her double talk do nothing to sway my opinion either. As a female, I'm offended by her manipulation. If I were a female journalist, I'd be doubly offended.

Posted by: tsmith_101 | September 15, 2010 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Hey, DikShuttle! Thanks and you raise a good question. The reason for locker room interviews is that, as I think you can tell from TV, very few good interviews come out of podium situations. (All the good stuff is on the Coors Light commercials.) The locker room is, honestly, a more relaxed environment and you get the chance to interview players one-on-one. Great stories, inside info isn't going to come out of an interview room.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 10:06 AM | Report abuse

So, what's the difference between incidents regarding this, and Christine Brennan, Jennifer Frey, and Lisa Olson?

I'd say Brennan handled her situation with more grace and aplomb than the rest.

(Plus, she's a Northwestern grad).

Posted by: bs2004 | September 15, 2010 10:15 AM | Report abuse

I won't tell you, tsmith_101, that I don't feel some anger although, like you, I need more information about what happened. I question the way Sainz dressed and the fact that she said she was in the locker room waiting for a player; you don't just stand there and wait. You talk to another player while you wait! I don't blame players for being angry about that. You talk to one of the other guys while you wait for the big star even if you don't use the material; you never have an idle moment in the locker room (that goes for men and women). And, um, shirts have buttons for a reason.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 10:16 AM | Report abuse

Conducting an interview in a locker room of athletes should be taken very seriously. Obviously there should be restrictions and guidelines followed. But in this case it appears that the journalist came with a different agenda. No knock on women being sports journalists/reporters in fact more power to you. That said, I'm pretty sure females know the written, unspoken and common sense guidelines and rules. I would agree with tsmith_101's assessment.

Posted by: darylandmelanie1 | September 15, 2010 10:18 AM | Report abuse

So this is the nature of media today: We trivialize that which is of critical importance, and make mountains of issues not of importance.

Ok.

Is Ms. Sainz a beautiful woman who was provacatively dressed in a locker room full of half naked men?

In my opinion, yes to all.

Should there be discipline if comments made by the players and staff raise above whistles/wolf calls?

Yes, definitely.

But while the NFL is looking into the behavior of it's players and coaches, perhaps they should also look into a dress code: for players/coaches AND the media.

I am a man and consider even wolf calls abhorant, and have tried to teach my son to feel the same way. No one should be made to feel like an object.

And no one should be rewarded for trying to elicit being an object.

To me, it seems we have a bit of both here.

Posted by: kban495 | September 15, 2010 10:30 AM | Report abuse

The situations involving Lisa and Jennifer were far more serious. From what I've heard, the Jets' behavior was nowhere close to this. Believe me, having a blow dryer thrown at you can't compare.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 10:36 AM | Report abuse

Kban495, good observations. It occurs to me that I was wearing jeans and a white shirt when the player threw the blow dryer at me. The differences in the situations: my jeans were less "hugging" and the buttons on my shirt were all engaged. Also, I was actively interviewing another player when the guy missed my strike zone.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 10:43 AM | Report abuse

So if your job REQUIRED you, as a woman, to be interviewed by a man after a long day of work in the Washington Post locker room, while you were naked or wearing a towel after a shower - you would be okay with this?

The whole point is equal rights, not additional rights because of past violations by previous generations.

I looked up Jack Morris' comments. What if he felt his personal privacy had been violated by a member of the opposite sex interviewing him in a professional setting while he was naked? What he had been a woman, and said "I don't talk to [a man] when I am naked unless they are on top of me or I am on top of them"?

Posted by: jimwest20 | September 15, 2010 10:52 AM | Report abuse

I agree with you, Cindy. If she were actually in the locker room just to do her job then she would not have been idle. I don't condone the objectification of women but I also don't condone women behaving like objects and then throwing a fit when they’re objectified. I have no problem with anyone who wants to be attractive. Don't we all want that in some form or another? Sainz however, appears to want that at the expense of professionalism and journalistic integrity. I can't support that. You've heard the expression "if it walks like a duck, talks like a duck and sounds like a duck, it's a duck." Well, I'd say "if you walk like a duck, talk like a duck and sound like a duck, be proud that you're a duck. Don't get mad at the world for saying quack or stop being a duck!" Sadly, I think this particular situation is all about publicity and there is no common sense at this point that is going to stop this train. If I were Suzy Kolber, Pam Oliver, Rachel Nichols, Shelley Smith or any of the other professional female sports journalists, I'd be more than a little bitter with Sainz!

Posted by: tsmith_101 | September 15, 2010 10:55 AM | Report abuse

jimwest20, I would be okay with this if my job required it. And I would have a nice fluffy beach towel.
I think that anyone, male or female, would feel pretty humiliated by a remark like Jack Morris', regardless whether it came from a man or a woman.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 10:57 AM | Report abuse

Cindy, the player who threw a blow dryer at you was involved in a criminal activity: assault.

It doesn't matter how you were dressed in that instance. assault is assault.

A little disclosure: I work for a media company. When I walk past the newrooms, the words, "provacative" and "sexy" does not come to mind.

"Stressed" and "focused" however, leaps out of the pages of my mind.

Also, I wouldn't stare directly into their eyes anymore than I would a lion in an open field. ;-)

Posted by: kban495 | September 15, 2010 11:01 AM | Report abuse

does it strike anyone else as weird that she refers to her jouralist colleagues "The Media". i dunno maybe she doesn't realize she's one of them.

Posted by: lilhollywood10 | September 15, 2010 11:08 AM | Report abuse

kban495, clearly, you work with ink-stained wretches! Yeah, the incident I experienced was assault. If he'd hit me, I honestly don't know what I'd have done...I'd probably be typing these words from my beachfront condo in Maui.
But I chose to deal with it by laughing. No question I was being tested at that moment. I must have passed because I never had another problem. It also helped enormously that the franchise player was on my side. Can't say enough good things about George Brett.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 11:17 AM | Report abuse

In any setting what a woman is wearing is not a condition for harassment. I thought we covered that issue ten years ago.

Posted by: sayzgor | September 15, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

No reporters (male or female) should be in the locker room. Players and locker room attendants are the only people who need to be in there. Will that make things a little more difficult for reporters? Probably. I don't care. Do real reporters go into politicians bedrooms to interview them while they and other politicians are changing? No, of course not.

Posted by: wkeane | September 15, 2010 11:48 AM | Report abuse

Cindy, overall I agree with your opinion on this matter, but I disagree with some of your comments about behavior in the locker room. You stated that these players should behave in a professional manner while these journalists are in the locker room and hold their comments until after those individuals leave. Well I think there is a double standards with this. Of course making crude comments is unprofessional, but it is equally unprofessional for this lady to be dressed the way she was dressed. Overall I just think that a locker room should be off limits, to any journalist regardless of gender, until those players are dressed and ready to talk to the media. I've never seen a point in history where a large group of men have been respectful of a woman that dresses that way. If she or anyone else expects to be treated professionally, then she should at least dress the part. Clearly from what is being said, she was not offended by the comments that were stated to her directly, so I don't see what the problem is. She dressed in a manner to get attention and she got the attention she wanted. A men's locker room is just not a setting that women should be in. Men have a tendency to be very crude with their remarks in that setting. This is an environment that is just prone to have conflict like this given the nature of men. I don't think anyone should expect men to act any differently in that setting because some men just will not care. They do deserve some privacy instead of being treated like zoo animals and having their every move analyzed just to create a story.

Overall I'm even more upset because I already see where this is going. This woman is going on every talk show and soon she will be on some reality show and then who knows what else? Unfortunately there is some woman that is making this to be about sexual harassment and sexism, which it could very well be, but last time I checked, men journalists don't go into locker rooms with women athletes when they are undressed so who's to say similar behavior wouldn't occur. Why is that the case? If that is the standard for women athletes then it should be the same for men athletes because as long as it stay like this then the men will always come off being chauvinistic. The media is making this to be a one-sided story but to me, as you have stated, they are both wrong and there needs to be some equality here.

Posted by: meatkins | September 15, 2010 11:56 AM | Report abuse

Cindy, overall I agree with your opinion on this matter, but I disagree with some of your comments about behavior in the locker room. You stated that these players should behave in a professional manner while these journalists are in the locker room and hold their comments until after those individuals leave. Well I think there is a double standards with this. Of course making crude comments is unprofessional, but it is equally unprofessional for this lady to be dressed the way she was dressed. Overall I just think that a locker room should be off limits, to any journalist regardless of gender, until those players are dressed and ready to talk to the media. I've never seen a point in history where a large group of men have been respectful of a woman that dresses that way. If she or anyone else expects to be treated professionally, then she should at least dress the part. Clearly from what is being said, she was not offended by the comments that were stated to her directly, so I don't see what the problem is. She dressed in a manner to get attention and she got the attention she wanted. A men's locker room is just not a setting that women should be in. Men have a tendency to be very crude with their remarks in that setting. This is an environment that is just prone to have conflict like this given the nature of men. I don't think anyone should expect men to act any differently in that setting because some men just will not care. They do deserve some privacy instead of being treated like zoo animals and having their every move analyzed just to create a story.

Overall I'm even more upset because I already see where this is going. This woman is going on every talk show and soon she will be on some reality show and then who knows what else? Unfortunately there is some woman that is making this to be about sexual harassment and sexism, which it could very well be, but last time I checked, men journalists don't go into locker rooms with women athletes when they are undressed so who's to say similar behavior wouldn't occur. Why is that the case? If that is the standard for women athletes then it should be the same for men athletes because as long as it stay like this then the men will always come off being chauvinistic. The media is making this to be a one-sided story but to me, as you have stated, they are both wrong and there needs to be some equality here.

Posted by: meatkins | September 15, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

Sayzgor, you are absolutely correct: Suggestive clothing is not an invitation to harassment. However, I would point out that her outfit might be considered questionable in many workplaces. For an hour a day, a locker room is a workplace for reporters and players.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 11:58 AM | Report abuse

Cindy,

Since you have worked at many levels in the press world, what do you think on extending the amount of time players have privately in the locker rooms by another 10 minutes?

Posted by: alex35332 | September 15, 2010 12:11 PM | Report abuse

This woman is making charges to promote her career. It should be obvious to anyone that women entering a male locker room have to put aside any pretentions they have to modesty. Just like a woman working in a house of ill-repute, they give up some of their rights by just being here. If you can't stand the heat, get out of the locker room.

Posted by: edwardallen54 | September 15, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

Hey alex35332! The only problem with that is our deadlines and the fact that it would give guys a longer time in which to duck out.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 12:26 PM | Report abuse

Reports are under even more intense deadlines now with instant access via the web than they were when I was covering the Washington Bullets from 1978 to 1984 for UPI. Since most of my reports were the short version that went out over the wire, I didn't have time to get quotes and they weren't necessary. I think all locker rooms should be CLOSED to all reporters and they can get their questions answered as the players leave, or the players can come out early in a towel, if necessary, to be interviewed for tight deadlines.

Posted by: dianewms@aol.com | September 15, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with you, Diane. Deadlines are even more pressing and relentlessly immediate now. We need the brief period of an open locker room. The interview room and having athletes brought out to reporters rarely yields anything interesting to read.

Posted by: Cindy Boren | September 15, 2010 12:37 PM | Report abuse

Cindy,
Well thats the point I think is essential here. You want players to wear a towel at "locker interviews". Its the LOCKEROOM, you are supposed to be able to be in a towel at your locker.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 1:00 PM | Report abuse

Cindy,
I think Inez is not the right person to be on the poster for equality of women in sports journalism. She knows how enticing her body is in the way she dresses, she uses that to her advantage. Thats why she states "she did not make the complaint", because I believe she was not truely offended, not that she asked for it, but she knows she is going to get that attention, its part of her (self imposed) job description, to attract male viewers.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 1:15 PM | Report abuse

Cindy,
I think Inez is not the right person to be on the poster for equality of women in sports journalism. She knows how enticing her body is in the way she dresses, she uses that to her advantage. Thats why she states "she did not make the complaint", because I believe she was not truely offended, not that she asked for it, but she knows she is going to get that attention, its part of her (self imposed) job description, to attract male viewers.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 1:17 PM | Report abuse

Here we go again with a woman's inability to grasp the obvious, but getting a lot of support in whatever endeavor a "she" aims herself at.

Let's be honest, when was the last time a fellow was in a woman's locker room?

not gonna happen, and men aren't as f'ed up in the brain to expect that he's going to come out of that locker room without some seeeerious backlash.

it must've been a cute thing to try, but I see this all the time, and the tool that is used to pry herself into accord with reality is that men abused her.

Give it a rest, ladies.

You have what you need, and asking for more cooperation is now becoming a test of your ability to blame others for your problems.

Why have women in the lockers, and if it's okay, then well men ought to have the same opportunities. Has a familiar feminist "ring" to it, now doesn't it?

Posted by: pgibson1 | September 15, 2010 1:20 PM | Report abuse

Cindy:

Sorry but you get dress like a Euro-Disco hottie and expect to get away with it. It takes two to Tango.The Jets should have asked her to leave and to return only when she was dressed more appropriately like a professional reporter.

What is cool in Mexico City, Rome or Paris isn't necessarily cool in NYC.

Posted by: dkane3 | September 15, 2010 2:11 PM | Report abuse

Ms. Boren, Sainz was there solely to do a story on Mark Sanchez. That's the reason she was waiting on a player in the locker room. dkane3: How, exactly, does a professional reporter dress? The fact is that if Sainz had been dressed the same way and she were considered "ugly" this would not have happened. But because she's beautiful and dressed in what you call "suggestive" clothing is neither here nor there. She could have been wearing a paper bag and probably still been subject to harassment.

Posted by: KDDavis | September 15, 2010 3:39 PM | Report abuse

Any woman who dresses like her (and God bless her for dressing like that) does it for the attention. In fact her whole career is based upon flaunting her body whenever and wherever she can. Of course she wasnt upset or offended, she hears stuff like that all the time precisely because of how she chooses to carry herself.

Other women in the locker were offended so they filed a report for her. Now she is changing her story so she can stay in the news. Whatever.

Posted by: divi3 | September 15, 2010 3:49 PM | Report abuse

KDDavis
As long as the paper bag didn't cover her butt. With a butt like that, she does not need a preety face.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

KDDavis
As long as the paper bag didn't cover her butt. With a butt like that, she does not need a pretty face.

Posted by: wdt32 | September 15, 2010 3:59 PM | Report abuse

What's really upsetting about the comments to this are the thinly veiled or even blatant claims of "she was asking for it by dressing that way." Regardless of what she was wearing, the people making catcalls and comments are adults who could have restrained themselves. I think more of grown men than to assume they cannot control themselves in the presence of a woman.

Being dressed unprofessionally is something that should be dealt with by her employers or, if it was out of the bounds of stadium rules (clearly it wasn't) by employees in the locker room. "She was asking for it" is NEVER a valid excuse for behavior.

Posted by: abazoe | September 15, 2010 4:18 PM | Report abuse

I hate that this issue has turned into a debate about women in the locker room. To me, that is a completely separate issue and really has nothing to do with the Ines Sainz controversy.

Why can't the media simply question Azteca TV and find out if--just as they did at the Super Bowl 3 years ago--they staged another publicity stunt?

Let's rewind: TV Azteca sent a female reporter to the Super Bowl in a wedding dress 3 years ago and had her shout that she was the real Mrs. Tom Brady.

Why are we now pretending like that never happened? Why are we pretending this is a real media organization and a real reporter?

Put the shoe on the other foot for a minute. Picture a phony news organization sent a phony reporter to a WNBA finals game and had the "reporter" dress in a wedding tux and go around telling everyone that they were married to the star player of one of the WNBA teams. Then, picture that same media organization sending another reporter to a WNBA practice in a flaunting outfit (think Borat) and then that this "reporter" went on to twitter a few minutes later talking about how "embarrassed" they were at the things the WNBA players were saying about him and then he goes on every talk show imaginable to talk about how he can't believe the WNBA players were harassing him in the locker room.

Do you REALLY think the media would respond in the same manner they have in this instance? Do you really think the WNBA would investigate the matter and condemn the WNBA team involved? Or do you think that everyone involved would simply dismiss the issue as yet another publicity stunt by a pseudo media outlet?

Cindy, your thoughts?

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 4:27 PM | Report abuse

"Regardless of what she was wearing, the people making catcalls and comments are adults who could have restrained themselves."

I'm sure they could have, but they didnt. And? She didnt even feel offended until after it became a way to keep her name in the news.

Basically we are asking these players to get as jacked up as all hell and beat the crap out of each other gladiator-style for our entertainment, then hop in the shower while a bikini-model dressed like a hooker stands there...but dont you dare say anything.

Sure, restraint is possible and probably the majority of guys didnt say anything. But given the situation, it will NEVER be that 100% of the men involved dont make any comments. Just not how life works.

Posted by: divi3 | September 15, 2010 4:30 PM | Report abuse

Women are allowed in the locker room and for the majority are treated with "respect" even if they are not always nice. Having said that everyone should be dressed appropriately.

A co-worker who is very well endowed constantly wears very very low cut outfits. One day she said "he was just talking to my breast..." which prompted a male co-worker and her good friend to say "well if they weren't hanging out..." which I thought was a good response.

Posted by: rlj1 | September 15, 2010 4:32 PM | Report abuse

Divi3, so the solution is to say boys will be boys and ignore problematic behavior? That solves everything, am I right? And whether or not her behavior since is questionable (it is) and the outfit questionable for a professional reporter (it probably is), what happened was problematic and symptomatic of a bigger problem.

Also bikini dressed hooker, well done on the exaggeration, it really supports your argument.

Posted by: abazoe | September 15, 2010 4:34 PM | Report abuse

And for what it's worth, the reason why some women, like myself, are reacting so strongly to this is because this is stuff we see all the time. Being catcalled, being objectified, being messed with because we're walking down a busy street wearing a sundress in the summer? You get sick of it. Seeing it happen in a case like this and hearing the same old tired reasons for it really grates -- especially when it's guys telling women how things are in the world (not saying you, Divi3, as I don't know whether you're male or female). Thanks, but I can use a lot less mansplaning and a lot more people understanding that treating people like objects is always wrong.

Posted by: abazoe | September 15, 2010 4:38 PM | Report abuse

At the Redskins game on Sunday night at halftime, I had 2 female Redskins fans that I had never met before continue to grab my *ss as I waited in line in front of them at the endzone bar. I turned around and they just giggled and asked me how I pronounced the name on my jersey "Captainchaos". Obviously, they weren't the sharpest tools in the shed, but I didn't go on twitter and tell the whole world about how embarrassed and objectified I felt. Instead, I took it as a compliment and went about ordering my drink.

People really need to stop looking for reasons to be offended. We are a hyper-sensitive society as is.

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 4:45 PM | Report abuse

Ines Sainz at the Super Bowl a few years ago was walking around trying to measure the muscles of NFL players. I wonder what she would have said on Twitter had some of the Jets tried to measure her...

How people are taking this woman seriously is beyond me.

Posted by: Barno1 | September 15, 2010 4:49 PM | Report abuse

abazoe, are you as equally upset that male reporters cant watch the brazilian beach volleyball team shower? Somehow I doubt it.

Not every single aspect of society can be exactly equal each and every second of our lives. A very attractive woman dressed provocatively in the midst of a group of naked men all jacked up after football practice is going to elicit catcalls sometimes. No amount of fines, indignation, or laws will ever change that.

For the most part male athletes are very cooperative with members of the opposite sex in the locker room- something no females anywhere have to deal with. Now we're trying to push that a little further and expect that a provocatively dressed woman whose entire career is based on flaunting her sexuality (nothing wrong with that btw) can hang out in the locker room without hearing nary peep? It's just not realistic.

Posted by: divi3 | September 15, 2010 4:50 PM | Report abuse

"Also bikini dressed hooker, well done on the exaggeration, it really supports your argument"

Uh, Sainz IS a bikini model.

Posted by: divi3 | September 15, 2010 4:56 PM | Report abuse

On behalf of the Washington Post, can you get me a press pass so I may do locker room interviews of the US Women's Soccer Team?

Posted by: reston75 | September 15, 2010 5:44 PM | Report abuse

whole thing is silly. Are men reporters allowed in female locker rooms while the women are showering and dressing ? She is milking her looks for all it's worth, and getting publicity like she never has. Who wants to bet you'll see her on the cover of Playboy or the SI swimsuit issue in the spring ?

Posted by: pelagicdiver | September 15, 2010 6:25 PM | Report abuse

I take your point that if we are going to have equal opportunity and men reporters are allowed in the locker room than women reporters need to be allowed as well. However, I do think there is a logical flaw in another part of your argument. The obvious solution would seem to be to not hold any interviews in the locker room, but you and other reporters don't want that because the locker room is a "more relaxed environment." I'm not sure if it was you but other reporters have talyou said so as well, but other reporters have talked about how much better it is to get the "raw" emotion--especially after games. It does seem to me that the same more relaxed environment and raw atmosphere (especially with testosterone-amped athletes after the game) that contributes to you getting a better story has some linkage to these kinds of incidents. What do you think?

Posted by: yeti1963 | September 15, 2010 7:33 PM | Report abuse

Sorry about the garble. The one sentence should have read,
" I'm not sure if you agree but other reporters have talked about how much better it is to get the "raw" emotion--especially after games."

Posted by: yeti1963 | September 15, 2010 7:35 PM | Report abuse

Divi3: she wasn't wearing a bikini during the interview, nor is she a hooker. But hey, keep digging.

And you are deviating from the argument and I'm not sure where you're going with it. I'm not talking about the equality of men and women in locker room interviews, so I think you might be derailing. My point is that she was allowed to be there, and that no matter what she was wearing saying "she was asking for it" is a horrible thing to claim. I really don't CARE that you are telling me it's reality and people have to deal with it, because that's a crappy attitude. The reality is crap, people should be called on bad and objectifying behavior, and it's a little bit off that you seem to think you can tell females how they should react to such things.

Assuming you are male, and I apologize if I'm incorrect, I think you need to check your privilege.

http://scienceblogs.com/thusspakezuska/2010/01/you_may_be_a_mansplainer_if.php

Posted by: abazoe | September 15, 2010 8:50 PM | Report abuse

This "reporter" has no business being in a locker room. She clearly does not take her job, or herself, seriously. Did anyone see her interview on FOX? If you want to tell people that you dont understand why you are being called a sex symbol then dont do that exact interview with your blouse unbuttoned past your bra.

Posted by: beerwineguy31 | September 15, 2010 9:41 PM | Report abuse

So why don't the reporters (male and female) just wait until after the players are "fully clothed" then? What's the rush of the reporters having to be there right after the game sitting there in the locker asking particular questions?

Posted by: aawitherspoon | September 16, 2010 1:28 AM | Report abuse

Cindy,

I don't know if you're done responding to comment, but I was wondering if you could answer a question for me.

How often is it the case in locker rooms that
a) the showers are in open view
b) the trip from the shower to the towels is in open view.

Care to comment?

Posted by: alterdox | September 16, 2010 6:48 AM | Report abuse

"They are entitled to that opinion" (not wanting women in locker rooms).

Yes, but if they express it, they will be castigated by the team, the media, and probably fined by the league.

Why not close the locker room to media for 45 minutes to allow players to shower and dress? I believe at present it is closed for 15. Or have a separate area for interviews to which all players must go or face a $10,000 fine?

Posted by: Nemo24601 | September 16, 2010 8:19 AM | Report abuse

Question:

Can men reporters get into locker rooms for women's sports? (BKB, Soccer, whatever).

I don't know the answer to this *honestly*.

Not that there are any women's sports that get attention at the same level as NFL teams, but I just wonder...

Posted by: cipitio | September 16, 2010 10:03 AM | Report abuse

The NFL has no legal obligation to allow females into male locker rooms.

There is no requirement that media organizations send male reporters into areas where female reporters are not permitted to work because they are female.

Third-parties are not responsible for creating equal opportunity in media organizations, or any other business that is independent of the league or its franchisees.

Requiring the league to permit any female or any female reporter into male locker rooms wrongly places a burden on teams to create equal employment opportunities outside of its own organization. It is not the duty of the league to assure access for any person or group at the expense of its duty to its owners and players. NFL equal opportunity policies pertain to its employees and franchees, not the female employees of organizations over which it has no control.

It is also a violation of workplace sexual harassment policy to force a male athlete to appear naked before females as this creates a hostile workplace environment. Men should not be made to change clothing, use the restroom, or shower in an area that is not secured from females. A man should not have to worry about a female encroaching his privacy at work any more than a woman should have to worry about men viewing her in her workplace locker rooms or restrooms, even for workplace safety reasons.

A female's right to do her newsgathering work does not take precedence over a male employee's right to bathe, use the toilet, or dress in private at his workplace.

How did we ever stray so far from common sense?

Posted by: blasmaic | September 16, 2010 6:49 PM | Report abuse

Cindy,

I have seen alot of conflicting online information regarding locker room access of interviews. The following is what I have pieced together:

The leagues set the policies for media access including locker room access times. The law requires equal access to all media members according to these policies to avoid discrimination. If league policy allows an open locker room and a male reporter is granted access to a male locker room the law states any equally credentialed female reporter would have the same access. Likewise if a female reporter is granted access to a female locker room, an equally credentialed male reporter would have the same access.

First is this a correct understanding? Second, how does this extend to public locker rooms. For example a NCAA swim meet where the locker room would be shared with other public users of the host rec. center facilities. If a reporter of the same sex entered the locker room could an opposite sex reporter claim the same right under the law?

Posted by: bhall945 | September 17, 2010 11:16 AM | Report abuse

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