Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

NFL says putting photos of illegal hits up for sale was a mistake

Updated at 9:31 a.m.

The NFL says it regrets the mistake in which photos of illegal and dangerous hits in Sunday's games were put up for sale online. The sale sent a mixed message after the league fined three players $175,000 on Tuesday for the hits and plans to suspend players for such hits going forward.

"Those photos will be removed ASAP & we will ensure no photos of illegal plays are available again," NFL spokesman Greg Aiello tweeted.

Replayphotos.com is an outside vendor licensed to sell photos from NFL games, as well as those from other sports, and uses an automated process to take photos from Associated Press photo feeds. According to the league, AP Photo is licensed to handle its commercial photo business.

Updated at 8:56 a.m.

The NFL says it regrets the mistake re: photos for sale of Harrison/Meriweather hits, and is correcting the process by which photos are selected, the New York Times' Judy Battista tweets.

Filed at 6:42 a.m.

The NFL fined James Harrison, Brandon Meriweather and Dunta Robinson after a Sunday of dangerous and occasionally illegal hits left the playing field littered with dazed, concussed players and promises that, going forward, players will be suspended for dangerous hits.

That leaves only one thing really left to do: make some money. Get the picture? No, they mean it ... get the picture!

You can purchase copies of the Harrison and Meriweather hits, taken by Associated Press photographers, from nfl.com, according to Doug Farrar, who also writes Smarter Stats for The Post.

Yes, indeed -- the NFL, that crackerjack enforcement organization when it comes to making sure that this kind of thing isn't glorified, is making additional cash on the photos (the "shots of the shots") it claims to find so reprehensible.
Here's the Harrison-Massaquoi shot.

jh1.jpg

The best-seller is a 15 x 20-inch unframed print for $54.95, but you can also get that size framed for $169.95, or a custom canvas gallery wrap for $249.95. Neat!
And here's the Meriweather-Heap hit. Actually, there are two different photos of this awesome/awful hit ... Same prices, which got me wondering -- if you order each illegal hit the NFL claims to be concerned about on a weekly basis (and still manages to profit from), do you get some sort of volume discount?

By Cindy Boren  | October 20, 2010; 6:42 AM ET
Categories:  NFL  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: A.J. Burnett goes shopping for zombie hands and vampire teeth (yawn)
Next: Video: Butler High School pulls off miraculous victory

Comments

The NFL, college, high school and youth football program directors really need to step back an critically analyze player injury data and what it has done to the fine young men of football. What does it really take to stop the ball in play? As a former wrestler I can tell you it doesn't take a chop block or some other torpedo type of blow that, when analyzed from a physics perspective, is tantamount to running into a tree stump at 15 miles an hour.

Granted, fans want to see a good, competitive game, but both football leagues and fans need to be educated better on what we have learned. The sacrifice is just too great.

I have a son who has played youth football for 4 years and usually witness 2 or 3 unnecessarily rough tackles/hits each game.

League directors need to re-define AND illustrate what types of tackles and blocks are permitted. They also need to clearly define AND illustrate what types of tackles and blocks are ILLEGAL.

The current rules provide verbiage, but SORELY LACKING are clear illustrations and videos to demonstrate legal vs. illegal tackles and blocks. There is no excuse for such lack of clarity. The players need so they can visualize proper technique.

Because such clarity is missing and league directors routinely look the other way, the referees and coaches ALWAYS fuss and fight when obvious violations do occur.

It's time for football league directors to wake up and make football rules more precise and safe. The lives of our athletes are on the line. One could argue with such adequate warning from the medical community that the next steps is for the courts to begin prosecutions of what would otherwise be considered 1st degree assault on another individual. Let's hope the courts don't have to get involved and the leagues clean up the game.

Think.

Posted by: ringlingj | October 20, 2010 1:29 PM | Report abuse

Personally, I think part of the problem is the players are basically armored, and wearing a helmet that they use as a weapon. All this allows the players that chose to do so, to launch themselves at another player. Again, this is counterintuitive, but I truly think that either eliminating the helmet altogether, or scaling it down to something almost equal to the old leather helmets they wore in the 30's would dramatically cause a reconsider leading with his helmet. If he does, he'll play half a game and his career is over. Maybe more importantly, scale the shoulder pads down to actual pads, rather than the hard indestructable plastic they are now. The pads are huge and if you watch all the vicious hits, almost every one is a guy driving his shoulder into the other guy's head area. All the flagrant hits this weekend, every one of them, was intended to maim the other player. I actually believe that when a guy like James Harrison launches himself helmet-first into a guy, then stands over him flexing, he needs to be thrown out of the game, and suspended. It's not a game at that point. He's just a thug that wants to see how badly he can hurt somebody. There's no need for it.

Posted by: AsstGM | October 20, 2010 1:57 PM | Report abuse

Former Redskins WR Art Monk used to routinely go across the middle of the field and endure all of the cheap shots LB would throw at him for catching the ball. Now they say that same activity now is illegal.
What game have they been watching for the past 30 years??

Posted by: digtldesk | October 20, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

Former Redskins WR Art Monk used to routinely go across the middle of the field and endure all of the cheap shots LB would throw at him for catching the ball. Now they say that same activity now is illegal.
What game have they been watching for the past 30 years??

Posted by: digtldesk | October 20, 2010 2:59 PM | Report abuse

It only became a mistake when they got caught.

The team owners could help stop this brutal showboating by removing the huge live-action screens in the stadiums.

The worst offenders can't wait to see their mugs on the screens after they make a play. They need to get over themselves and removing the screens could help them realize they are doing what they are paid the big bucks to do. The fans aren't interested in their silly dances.

Posted by: apspa1 | October 20, 2010 3:02 PM | Report abuse

Just don't speak people with your helmet, hit them as hard as you can with your shoulderpad.

Posted by: ozpunk | October 20, 2010 3:19 PM | Report abuse

Just don't spear people with your helmet, hit them as hard as you can with your shoulderpad.

Posted by: ozpunk | October 20, 2010 3:29 PM | Report abuse

ozpunk, that'd be cool if that was the NFL's stance. The hit on Desean Jackson was *not* by helmet... it was shoulder pad to the upper chest. Dunta Robinson's now $50000 poorer. Ridiculous.

Posted by: cpayne624 | October 21, 2010 8:25 AM | Report abuse

Even if players like Dunta Robinson lead with the shoulder instead of the head, players can still land head first to the ground, leading to concussions that way. Should players be fined for a vicious hit (not led by helmet to helmet contact) when the other guy falls to the ground and is knocked out by contact with their helmet to the ground? Football is a physical sport. Unfortunately it has grown more violent and more physical. Either don't watch the games, or don't play them. No one forces these players to play football and no one forces fans to watch it.

Posted by: basschronicles | October 21, 2010 10:53 AM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company