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Austin Collie alert and sitting up after scary collision with Kurt Coleman

By Cindy Boren

Updated at 6:07 p.m.

Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Austin Collie was taken from the field on a cart after being knocked out in a helmet-to-helmet collision with Philadelphia Eagles safety Kurt Coleman.

Collie, according to Colts president Bill Polian, has a concussion but is alert and sitting up in the locker room.

Collie, who was hurt after catching a pass over the middle midway through the second quarter of the game in Philadelphia, appeared to be knocked out before he hit the ground. He was immobilized and placed on a board, then taken to the locker room. Collie was conscious as he was taken from the field and Colts quarterback Peyton Manning came over and spoke to him briefly.

Although safety Quintin Mikell also was in on the play. Coleman was flagged for making contact with Collie's helmet.

The play most likely will trigger another week of debate over whether the NFL's crackdown on illegal and dangerous hits is weakening the game.

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By Cindy Boren  | November 7, 2010; 5:43 PM ET
Categories:  NFL  
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Comments

One day soon, the NFL is going to have another paralyzed receiver, or one that has his career ended on brain injury after a "Thug Hit", even dead.

Saying the public LOVES it!! Is like saying we need more deaths and mangled people at NASCAR events "because that is what people want to see!"

Posted by: ChrisFord1 | November 7, 2010 7:40 PM | Report abuse

Agreed. I'm part of the public. I did not love this at all.

Posted by: bkshane | November 7, 2010 7:57 PM | Report abuse

How is this for an idea on how to stop these kind of injurious hits? When the player puts another player out of the game due to a hit like this then they are suspended until the injured player's return. Out for the game - so are you. Out for the season - so are you. Career ending injury - you won't see these after a couple of the "out for games" suspension.
These thugs will clean up their acts when their paycheck is stopped.
Fines don't stop them but taking away their paycheck just might.
Just an idea. But I also realize that NFL won't do that because these excite a certain percentage of the fans.
Still something drastic needs to be done.

Posted by: LarryinMD | November 7, 2010 8:09 PM | Report abuse

It seemed to me like the REF's were doing almost everything in their power, to make sure that INDY would win the game.

I personally believe it was a legal hit & an unfortunate accident. I hope that Austin Collie will recover, and that the Eagles DB will NOT be peanalized, for this accident.

Posted by: Robbnitafl | November 7, 2010 8:38 PM | Report abuse

Are we that far removed from the gladiators in the arenas? Concussions like this are pretty serious and may affect this young player for the rest of his life. Anything that can be done to make football more skill less brawn is fine with me.

Posted by: MNUSA | November 7, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

That wasn't a dirty hit at all. He led with his shoulder. Bad luck. Collie put his head down and it just happened. Too bad the NFL will overreact.

Posted by: Sticksboi35 | November 7, 2010 8:43 PM | Report abuse

I was sickened by the paralyzing of the Rutgers player a couple of weeks back. I saw an Indiana State U. player take as bad a hit last year. I know he was in the hospital for a long time. There was little press coverage of this one.

The NFL and the NCAA need to put an end to the culture that sees head to head hits as necessary and part of the culture. As clean hits. Enough is enough.

Posted by: Senavifan | November 7, 2010 8:58 PM | Report abuse

Popped him in the back of the head no less. On the previous drive, an Eagle defensemen hit a runner on the ground after he had been tackled, and did so while leading with his helmet, driving it into the helmet of the grounded runner. I was surprised there was no flag. Eagles play dirty. They always have. Helmet to helmet is a bad deal and if the NFL doesn't get a grib, the union players deserve to sue compensation.

Posted by: tcsi | November 7, 2010 9:06 PM | Report abuse

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Posted by: ajdfhdfgtsdgasd | November 7, 2010 9:26 PM | Report abuse

The problem is that both defensive and offensive players are lowering their heads at the conclusion of a play. Receivers are trying to protect themselves, defensive players are trying to punish a receiver who has made a successful catch. I've heard defensive backs make statements to this effect over the last 35 years. So we are going to have to have a culture change to end these injuries. It has to start at a young age if you want defensive players to stop leading with their helmets. As a defensive tackle in high school my coach encouraged me to use whatever I could to get to the quarterback, including poking my fingers in the eyes of the player opposing me. So at the age of 14 I was expected to hurt another player to help win the game.
I agree with the preceding comment that encouraged taking the defensive back out of the game for as long as it took the receiver to make it back to playing status. Another sure way to change things would be to start dealing out serious fines to the owners and coaches of the teams that allow a defensive back to lead with his helmet. Say a $1 million fine to the owner of a team and a $100,000 fine to a head coach. There would be a lot of defensive backs cooling their heals on the bench until they could retrain themselves to hold their head up while finishing a tackle.

Posted by: unsavoury | November 7, 2010 10:22 PM | Report abuse


I too was thinking of gladiators when I was reading this story. I would have thought that we had advanced to the point where we no longer found this sort of thing entertaining, but apparently I am wrong.

Posted by: jackrussell252521 | November 7, 2010 10:31 PM | Report abuse

That was a nasty hit, but it looked completely unintentional to me. Collie lowered his head into it. I don't know how you stop something like that. Different kind of helmet?

Posted by: taonima2000 | November 7, 2010 10:43 PM | Report abuse

Personally, I don't follow football but from the video it is clear that #42 intended to make a dangerous helmet to helmet hit when it could have been avoided. He should be suspended for the season.

Posted by: mehrenst1 | November 7, 2010 11:22 PM | Report abuse

The best way to stop this is for the players to sue and the viewers to ask for their money back. Since when is money more important than the safety of its players.
shuttdlrl

Posted by: shuttdlrl | November 7, 2010 11:57 PM | Report abuse

The players should sue, the viewers should turn off their televisions, and the people in the bleachers should ask for their money back. Time to stop the cheating and use strategy.
shuttdlrl

Posted by: shuttdlrl | November 8, 2010 12:07 AM | Report abuse

Oh give it a rest! You cannot legislate safety into an inherently violent sport where it's nearly impossible to make a split-second decision to pull-up or to predict if and where helmets will collide. No one wants to see a catastrophic injury (in football, skydiving, NASCAR, X-Sports, AA fuel dragsters, Formula 1, boxing, etc etc) but it HAPPENS! And in the NFL with large, strong men colliding at 18 -22 mph taught all their football lives to get low (offensive and defensive players), it's inevitable that someone's going to get hurt! It's part of the game. Players know it, fans know it and TV generates ratings and revenue because of it.

Posted by: theamerican | November 8, 2010 12:09 AM | Report abuse

I'm not too sympathetic to this argument. Football is a contact sport. The players know this and play anyway.

Besides which the best way to hit (the way that you avoid injury more often than not) is to get your momentum moving forward through your target. This involves lowering your shoulders. Your head, last time I checked, is attached to your shoulders. Helmet to helmet contact is inevitable.

Stop whining, and if you're worried about your kid in your local Pop Warner league, don't sign him up.

Posted by: toreador | November 8, 2010 12:20 AM | Report abuse

What happened to Collie was unfortunate. You gotta have to quit crying about this stuff, as it is more damaging to the game than drug abuse or illegal gambling, etc. Collie was by no means defenceless. He had time to catch the ball, turn, run, and lower his head. Now if he had caught the ball, turned suddenly and took a shot in the head, you might have a legitimate argument. But enough has been done to defences over the years, this crap has to stop. How many times have we seen a player lower his head and lower his head and bounce off a tackle just because a defender couldn't get down to hit the ball-carrier with the same force. Everyone uses their head in the game, and maybe this crybaby skirt of a commissioner (yeah, I said it Roger Goodell is a wuss), would spend more time finding safer equipment instead of chewing out defenders, we might not be having this argument. The bottom line is that these men are the gladiators of our time and these instances, while unfortunate, are going to happen.

Posted by: footballdude | November 8, 2010 4:00 AM | Report abuse

What happened to Collie was unfortunate. You gotta have to quit crying about this stuff, as it is more damaging to the game than drug abuse or illegal gambling, etc. Collie was by no means defenceless. He had time to catch the ball, turn, run, and lower his head. Now if he had caught the ball, turned suddenly and took a shot in the head, you might have a legitimate argument. But enough has been done to defences over the years, this crap has to stop. How many times have we seen a player lower his head and lower his head and bounce off a tackle just because a defender couldn't get down to hit the ball-carrier with the same force. Everyone uses their head in the game, and maybe this crybaby skirt of a commissioner (yeah, I said it Roger Goodell is a wuss), would spend more time finding safer equipment instead of chewing out defenders, we might not be having this argument. The bottom line is that these men are the gladiators of our time and these instances, while unfortunate, are going to happen.

Posted by: footballdude | November 8, 2010 4:00 AM | Report abuse

Mommas don't let your babies grow up to be football players if you can't take the concept of injury via contact sports.... and football is an alpha contact sport. Golf is more fun and easier on the body. Football is fun, too, but it is'nt played in Nabbypammby Land...just count on injury. It's part of the game.

Posted by: seakeys | November 8, 2010 6:54 AM | Report abuse

This was a very unfortunate ACCIDENT. He was not in an unprotected stance, e.g. he had taken a couple of steps and lowered his head, meaning he was NOT a defenseless player, and the hit was legal. I am not condoning illegal hits that have occurred in the league, and I support protecting the players'. The bottom line, I hope Collie makes a full recovery. All of the people talking about a "thug hit", you are absolutely wrong, in this case!!!!!!!

Posted by: awfulexcuse1 | November 8, 2010 6:55 AM | Report abuse

If you watch the film, Austin Collie lowered HIS head. If there WAS helmet-to-helmet (which I don't see; what replay were you people watching?), Collie initiated it. Why wasn't Collie flagged?

Posted by: dmm1 | November 8, 2010 9:56 AM | Report abuse

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