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Baseball seeks to limit teams' champagne celebrations

gingerale.jpeg

No matter who wins World Series between the San Francisco Giants and the Texas Rangers, there will be a different look to the celebration on the field and in the locker room.

Say adieu to champagne and hello to ginger ale, perhaps as early as tonight with the Giants leading the series 3-1. The Rangers have celebrated American League Division Series and Championship Series wins by popping the tops for a while on ginger ale bottles out of respect for Josh Hamilton, who's battled addiction. Now, Major League Baseball has taken it a step further.

Last week, the New York Times reported Sunday, new guidelines were sent to teams, according to Rob Manfred, the executive vice president of MLB. Teams must limit champagne and offer a non-alcoholic version. Beer and other alcoholic drinks are banned. Teams are not allowed to bring the drinks on the field.

"We have concerns that these celebrations that have traditionally been held not get out of hand," Manfred told the Times. "This is an issue that we periodically revisit."

As long as the celebratory beverage bubbles and fizzes and sprays (especially hitting Tim McCarver), who cares if it's an alcoholic beverage, right? Especially after the deaths of Josh Hancock and Nick Adenhart.

"I think the celebrations are unattractive in large measure because they involve alcohol," Fay Vincent, the former baseball commissioner, told the Times. "It's ritualized, and I think it's silly."

By Cindy Boren  | November 1, 2010; 10:49 AM ET
Categories:  MLB  
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Comments

Pathetic. What are they gonna do take the trophy away? I hope SF parties their faces off. I bet Barry Zito can afford a few cases of beer.

Posted by: mjwies11 | November 1, 2010 12:18 PM | Report abuse

But when they get to a game seven (or game five in the opening series) what will they do with the drinks stocked for the losing team?

Nobody's going to want to drink some lousy ginger ale or godawful sparkling crap without booze in it. I mean, come on, people, think of the unconscionable waste inherent to this new rule.

Posted by: NateinthePDX | November 1, 2010 1:07 PM | Report abuse

These baseball "celebrations" have turned into a joke. Win division or clinch playoff spot: locker room champaign celebration. Win division series: locker room champaign celebration. Win league series:locker room champaign celebration. Win World Series: locker room champaign celebration.

Do you think teams in other sports do this much celebrating? No, it's unique to baseball, and I think when they expanded the playoffs in 1995, nobody knew exactly what to do after a division series win, so they said, "what the heck, let's party."

I can see it for a LCS or of course the World Series, but let's also limit the times teams actually fire-hose the locker room.

Posted by: AnnandaleAnnie | November 1, 2010 1:40 PM | Report abuse

Dear Fay Vincent,

Humans have used alcohol in ritual celebrations for thousands of years...probably going back to the evening of the day the first accidentally-fermented beverage was consumed.

Posted by: EdTheRed | November 1, 2010 2:00 PM | Report abuse

Really dumb political correctness.

Posted by: mcstowy | November 1, 2010 4:11 PM | Report abuse

The influence of the Neo-Puritans, Mormons, fundamental right wing religious conservatives and others is merging and will take over discourse in the area of personal behavior in a few years. There was a time when no one believed Prohibition would be enacted, either. The Canadians and Europoeans were incredulous then and they will be again.

Posted by: socaloralpleazer | November 1, 2010 6:27 PM | Report abuse

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