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Posted at 1:30 PM ET, 01/19/2011

Ron Franklin sues ESPN for wrongful termination

By Cindy Boren

Ron Franklin has filed suit against ESPN for wrongful termination.

Confirming to USA Today that he has filed suit, Franklin, fired Jan. 4, declined to specify any other details of the suit.

Franklin, who called college football and basketball games, was fired for allegedly calling reporter Jeannine Edwards "sweet baby" and an expletive in a production meeting for a bowl game. Franklin apologized and said in a statement at the time: "I said some things I shouldn't have and am sorry. I deserved to be taken off the Fiesta Bowl."

By Cindy Boren  | January 19, 2011; 1:30 PM ET
Categories:  College basketball, College football  
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Comments

On some level I hope this case proceeds and a bunch more nasty stuff comes out about Franklin...

Can't help seeing him as one of those dinosaurs who simply dismisses the idea of women in the workplace in anything other than a secretarial or support role for the he-man menfolk doing the heavy lifting.

You can't spell Ron Franklin without a capital F...

Posted by: NateinthePDX | January 19, 2011 2:40 PM | Report abuse

"Can't help seeing him as one of those dinosaurs who simply dismisses the idea of women in the workplace in anything other than a secretarial or support role...."
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Don't know about Franklin, but this perfectly describes ESPN. Where are the women in the football broadcast booths? Where are the women on the panels discussing the games, before and after?

The real question is why did ESPN fire someone who perfectly reflects their company?

Posted by: llrllr | January 19, 2011 3:05 PM | Report abuse

How come women don't play football? They are obviously subject matter experts on the game, right llrllr?

Posted by: englundc | January 19, 2011 3:40 PM | Report abuse

And men can't be an OB/GYN because they can't experience childbirth, right?

Posted by: marathoner | January 19, 2011 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Actually, most of the women that I know prefer a female OB/GYN. Just sayin...

Posted by: sonny2 | January 19, 2011 4:22 PM | Report abuse

Don't know about Franklin, but this perfectly describes ESPN. Where are the women in the football broadcast booths? Where are the women on the panels discussing the games, before and after?

The real question is why did ESPN fire someone who perfectly reflects their company?

Posted by: llrllr

__________________________________________

The reason there are very few women doing football coverage/analysis is because it is mostly men who watch football and almost entirely men who play football. Men would like to hear coverage/analysis from people they perceive as experts and given that women don't play football its hard to accept their opinion on the subject. A similar example would be the cast of The View. How come there are no men on The View? Because The View caters to a female audience and women would rather hear other women talk about the issues than men.

Posted by: nperazich | January 19, 2011 5:02 PM | Report abuse

I'll take it one step further.
Women were put on the sidelines to grab player interviews - becauses the guys would stop and talk to a good looking woman when they wouldn't for a some guy there.
Frankly, men want to hear other men discuss and commentate on sports, it's just a guy thing. A particular woman may know as much about it despite not playing it perhaps - but men want connect with men when it comes to sports. It's just that simple.

Posted by: MarineDolphin | January 19, 2011 6:58 PM | Report abuse

It's just a game.

Posted by: RepealObamacareNow | January 19, 2011 8:14 PM | Report abuse

When I say "men," I mean me because my tastes are the tastes of all men. I am the one universal man.

Posted by: markfromark | January 19, 2011 8:23 PM | Report abuse

The fact is that numerous men at ESPN have been far worse to women than Ron Franklin and still have their jobs. Chris Berman has widely been reported as referring to a woman by her coat ("you're with me, leather"). Mike Tirico was suspended for three months -- but not fired -- after hitting on production assistants and asking a female producer to sleep with him via email, all while married (http://deadspin.com/191242/here-are-those-tirico-stories-we-hinted-at-last-week). Sean Salisbury sent pictures of his member via cell phone text message (he ultimately was dismissed, after several months). On the other hand, (black) Harold Reynolds was dismissed after hugging a co-worker and (old) Ron Franklin was dismissed. So if you're expendable, you get shown the door pretty quick but if you're a star, not so much.

Posted by: gbooksdc | January 19, 2011 9:06 PM | Report abuse

Just found out about this today and have to say this is more PC BS. Why can't people be grown ups and deal w/ the occasional work place blow up?? If she called him an 'old fart' do you think she would have been fired? Wouldn't this be age discrimination? I doubt she would have been, nor should she have. I know all minorities (how women are minorities I will never figure out) aren't whining babies but until they are not perceived as such they will always pay the price of people being hesitant to hire them and deal w/ their complaints and lawsuits.
As far as women in football goes, get real, 80 percent of the audience doesn't want to hear them because they could care less what they have to say. I would think it would be embarrassing to know that the only reason there are female sideline reporters is as 'pretty window dressing'. You never see overweight homely sideline reporters.
I know this is the WP web site and naturally inundated w/ libs but you guys should stick to something you know, like supporting people that won't work, not blabbering on about female sports broadcasters.

Posted by: mapinolenc | January 21, 2011 3:44 AM | Report abuse

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