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Posted at 11:11 AM ET, 03/10/2011

Officials who worked Rutgers-St. John's game withdraw from Big East tourney

By Cindy Boren

Updated at 12:25 p.m.

The officials who worked the Big East Conference tournament game Wednesday between St. John's and Rutgers -- the one in which two fouls and a technical were not called -- have withdrawn from the tournament.

Citing an anonymous conference source, ESPN first reported that Jim Burr, Tim Higgins and Earl Walton have voluntarily withdrawn in the "best interests everyone involved."

"Our officials are a very dedicated and loyal group of professionals who care deeply about the Big East Conference," Big East Commissioner John Marinatto said in a statement released by the conference. "In the best interests of everyone involved -- including coaches, student-athletes, game officials and Big East member institutions -- the officials who were assigned to the St. John's-Rutgers game Wednesday have voluntarily withdrawn for the remainder of the 2011 Big East Championship. With three days of competition remaining, it is our hope that everyone will now focus on our outstanding teams and exciting games ahead."

St. John's beat Rutgers 65-63 in the second-round game in Madison Square Garden, but the Red Storm's Justin Brownlee was not called for traveling or for stepping out of bounds (or given a technical for heaving the ball into the stands) with 1.7 seconds left in the game.

By Cindy Boren  | March 10, 2011; 11:11 AM ET
Categories:  College basketball  
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Comments

Whatever the refs are paid by the schools/NCAA is nothing compared to what sports books pay them for the preferred outcome. The 'officiating' of this game made that crystal clear. It's known that pro refs are paid to influence outcomes by bookies (Tim Donaghy anyone?)and it is also evident that this is done at the college level as well. Any sane human who sees how this game was called at the end can come to no other conclusion.

Posted by: splitbill | March 10, 2011 11:55 AM | Report abuse

What a joke..........
And what a shame.

Posted by: jlina | March 10, 2011 12:02 PM | Report abuse

Well...the total was already covered and I doubt that St. John would have covered the 10. However...these refs should be fined and banned for life.

Posted by: untergrund | March 10, 2011 1:27 PM | Report abuse

THE BIG EAST, should have made these refs withdraw, NOT THE REFS!!! The Big East should, immediately conduct an independent investigation. I have never, ever, seen such favortism in refereeing, like I saw in that game. I am neither a St. John's fan nor a Rutgers fan. I have watched thousands of college basketball games. The officiating in this game made me sick.

This kind of officiating can only lead one to believe that these officials were on the payola. This kind of officiating tarnishes college basketball, perhaps indelibly.

I love college basketball, but to let a bunch of officials, like these ever, ever officiate another game, would be a travesty beyond belief. Please do not ruin the game by letting these officials ever set foot on a basketball court again.

Posted by: LuvDCArea | March 10, 2011 3:16 PM | Report abuse

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