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Does 'School Choice' Have to Mean Privatizing Education?

No.

By Ezra Klein  |  May 22, 2009; 11:30 AM ET
 
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Comments

Duh.

Posted by: bluegrass1 | May 22, 2009 4:06 PM | Report abuse

Look, the real push for shifting to vouchers has nothing to do with inability of school systems to craft effective public school programs. Voucher proponents really want only to try to fund public education on the cheap and to be able to continue their segregationist propensities at tax-payer expense. That's it in a nutshell and everything else is just a smoke-screen intended to hide that kernel of knowledge.

Posted by: Linksmann | May 22, 2009 7:11 PM | Report abuse

Colorado has school choice among public schools. One can open enroll in any public school in the state provided there is room. Preferences are governed by a variety of rules. This has led to many interesting dynamics. Since neighborhoods are no longer tied to local schools, neighborhoods can be more integrated than the schools. For reasons that are hotly debated, in some districts more white students open enroll out of their home school than minority students. The resulting "stratification" of the schools has become an issue in the Boulder Valley School District. One article about this from the Boulder Daily Camera is at http://www.dailycamera.com/news/2008/apr/20/bvsd-inching-toward-desegregation-altruism-and/

Posted by: jbw4 | May 26, 2009 2:40 PM | Report abuse

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