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It's Not TV, It's HBO

I don't know how many "Entourage" fans we have on this blog, but last night's episode was really the ne plus ultra of the show's peculiar fantasy world: One of the problems that the characters had to resolve was that too many people were giving Turtle free Ferraris for his birthday.

I can't decide if Entourage is the perfect show for the recession or a totally doomed enterprise.

By Ezra Klein  |  July 27, 2009; 10:46 AM ET
 
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Comments

Choice not required. Anything that's a totally doomed enterprise is a perfect show for the recession. Start with the US economy, for instance.

Posted by: JimPortlandOR | July 27, 2009 10:51 AM | Report abuse

I get a kick out of Entourage, the characters are very engaging, especially Johnny Drama. But I missed it last night.

Posted by: bdballard | July 27, 2009 10:58 AM | Report abuse

I love Entourage, but it's definitely a guilty pleasure.

Posted by: smhjr1 | July 27, 2009 11:01 AM | Report abuse

Bill Simmons nailed Entourage and its limitations as a show back in 2004:

"Hence, the biggest problem with "Entourage": Because of the casting mistakes, it's an entertaining show with a built-in ceiling. It can be good, never great. Once the creators (begrudgingly) accept E's limitations, I worry that the show will evolve like "Sex and the City" did, with the characters becoming more and more one-dimensional, the dialogue more and more forced, the situations more and more ludicrous. Eventually it could become a parody of itself, like the way "Sex and the City" ended up -- four spent characters racing to beat each other to the next overwritten punchline.

That's the real reason everyone in Hollywood is disappointed. In every episode, Piven's agent inadvertently demonstrates how the show squandered a rare chance -- they could have parodied celebrities and posses in the same vicious way. Instead, they chose to glorify them -- there's the cool house, the fancy cars, the celeb cameos, the kickin' theme song, and every show seems to end with them sitting or standing together, gazing out to an ocean or a skyline. We get it, we get it. They're living the life. The kids from Queens made it."

Full review available here:
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-comments.cgi

Posted by: erh1103 | July 27, 2009 11:16 AM | Report abuse

Oops, I meant here:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/040914

Posted by: erh1103 | July 27, 2009 11:18 AM | Report abuse

Considering that they're in their sixth season, "doomed enterprise" doesn't seem to fit. But yeah, maybe it's time for them to fizzle out.....

Posted by: wovenstrap | July 27, 2009 11:46 AM | Report abuse

I think the correct answer is that Entourage was the perfect show for the mid-Aughties' financial bubble. It's looking more and more out of touch in 2009. (Aside: I bet Sarah Jessica Parker, et al., say thankful prayers every night that the put out their Sex and the City movie in '08 rather than '09.)

Posted by: JEinATL | July 27, 2009 1:35 PM | Report abuse

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