Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity

Tab Dump

Ed Glaeser considers Jane Jacobs.

Starvation amid abundance.

Ta-Nehisi Coates considers the logic — or lack thereof — of street violence.

The "Great Arteries" theory of history.

Mosquitoes do not like us all equally.

The Brookings Institution gets a bunch of experts to explain how to bend long-term health-care spending.

By Ezra Klein  |  September 4, 2009; 6:41 PM ET
Categories:  Tab Dump  
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Touching the Stove
Next: What Is an Excise Tax, and Can It Save Health Reform?

Comments

On the front page of the Wall Street Journal today:

States Shut Down to Save Cash: Maine, Maryland, Michigan Slash Service; Nightmare at California Vehicle Regisrty

I hope the people of Maine remember how their senators were responsible for greatly cutting aid to states in the stimulus bill, and how they may have greatly worsened the universal health care bill, if one even becomes law.

Positions matter far more than attractive personalities, and party is gigantically correlated with positions today.

If the people of Maine don't want Republican actions and consequences, they better think carefully before voting for Republicans because they like their personalities. For their families' sake as well as the whole country's I hope they do.

Posted by: RichardHSerlin | September 4, 2009 7:05 PM | Report abuse

Ezra, I have two daughters, one in Cambridge MA & one in DC. When I last visited the one in Cambridge, she took me to O Ya. In two weeks, I will visit the one in DC who plans to take me to Komi.

Aren't kids great?

Posted by: lensch | September 4, 2009 8:07 PM | Report abuse

the theme song of this great american should be played at the beginning of every community town hall meeting.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-tUd_Ji-AY
maybe then, people wont be getting injured and having their fingers bitten off.
mr. rogers would have loved to have had president obama come on his show as a guest, to talk to children.
it is a sorry day in the united states when parents and legislators denigrate a president who is taking the time to speak to children.
his desire to reach out to school children should be commended and celebrated.
well, i know mr rogers would have greatly approved, and that is good enough for me.

lensch, you must have very appreciative, caring daughters. that is so nice that they would take you to those lovely places.

Posted by: jkaren | September 4, 2009 11:42 PM | Report abuse

here is another mr rogers video that is a "must watch" at town hall meetings.
here he is using a puppet to teach pre-schoolers not to bite other people.
maybe there just arent enough people around, like mr rogers.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mu-Vy2koYp0&feature=related

Posted by: jkaren | September 4, 2009 11:46 PM | Report abuse

This step requires near-universal participation in insurance markets to succeed. Finally, individual patients should be given greater support for improving their health and lowering overall health care costs, including incentives for achieving measurable health goals.

------------------------

its so good that the academics at the Brookings Institute realize the benefit of an individual mandate unlike some around here.

Also its a shame that Democrats didn't listen to them when they look for incentives for achieving measurable health goals as the "Safeway model" does. I asked Frank Pallone at a town hall several weeks back about it and he stammered around the question and basically said well it wasn't fair to do that to some people, er uh charge them more, etc. I said, no they wouldn't charge them more they'd charge them the same but those that actually took care of themselves, lived healthy lifestyles would be given extra cash incentives. Sorry no deal for Mr Pallone. I guess he likes us all fat and on the couch eating Cheetos. Its a shame because Safeway saved $54 million dollars in doing that. You'd think that kind of savings multiplied across the country could not only help in the short run but if it reduces the obesity in this country it could sustain us in the long run as well.

Posted by: visionbrkr | September 4, 2009 11:49 PM | Report abuse

visionbrkr, you have this strange idea that people have nothing better to do than go to the doctor. People already have "skin in the game" when it comes to their health. Namely, their health.

Posted by: tyromania | September 5, 2009 1:44 AM | Report abuse

of all of the political, domestic news i have read this week, i find this to be the most seriously disturbing.
a president, who rose to that position, not by privilege, but by determination and education, who wants to speak to school kids, about self-reliance, accomplishment and service....and a governor and other legislators are shunning, speaking out against him, and parents are thinking of keep their children home from school.
what a dishonorable, counter-productive lesson to teach a child about civics, humanity, respect for accomplishment.
deeply, deeply troubling.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/09/04/rick-perry-obama-speech-d_n_277812.html

Posted by: jkaren | September 5, 2009 7:52 AM | Report abuse

on the mosquitos piece: i don't doubt that skeeters prefer blood type O. but isn't type O by far the most prevalent blood type? it could be darwinian on the part of mosquitos - they prefer a blood type they have more access to.

Posted by: mohloff | September 6, 2009 4:00 PM | Report abuse

on the mosquitos piece: i don't doubt that skeeters prefer blood type O. but isn't type O by far the most prevalent blood type? it could be darwinian on the part of mosquitos - they prefer a blood type they have more access to.

Posted by: mohloff | September 6, 2009 4:02 PM | Report abuse

tyromania,

have you ever seen an ER littered with people with bee stings, poison ivy? I have, plenty of times. If they don't have insurance they use it as a doctor's office (understandably they have no other option before you throw that back at me) and some of those have insurance but their ER copay is too low. If its $50 and you raised it to $100 or $200 then people would think twice before wasting precious resources.

I think back to Ezra's post on the Nixon/Kennedy debate on health insurance in the 70's when they both wanted people to have indemnity plans with between a $300 and $450 deductible before any benefits kick in and a maximum out of pocket cost of between $1000 and $1500.

in today's dollars that would be around a $1500-$2000 deductible and a $5000 maximum out of pocket. Sounds like an HSA to me as long as you're giving the tax incentives as well. but hey that would make people think instead of just expecting everything to be paid for.

Posted by: visionbrkr | September 7, 2009 7:35 AM | Report abuse

visionbrkr, you have this strange idea that people have nothing better to do than go to the doctor. People already have "skin in the game" when it comes to their health. Namely, their health.

Posted by: tyromania | September 5, 2009 1:44 AM | Report abuse


and if they were that concerned about their health we wouldn't have the obesity problem that we do in this country.

Posted by: visionbrkr | September 7, 2009 10:24 AM | Report abuse

Only government and poorly informed journalist could love a plan that decides my health care is too good that that it will be taxed to do away with it.

Is the object of this exercise to ensure everybody has health care of some sort, or that everybody has the same health care?

Cause it's going to be a wonderful sitting in a doctor's office next to the fat smoking guy and the wino knowing full well that I used to walk right in and get served.

It will be a joy that I won't be able to go to my doctor's office the next day (as I can today) because there are too many people in front of me.

Also, the joy in an HMO-like plan where they decide if I get treated, instead of me, will be indescribable. I mean, I wouldn't take an HMO with a 10-foot pole today, but if the government decides that's the kind of plan that's best for me, who am I to argue?

Can't hardly wait.

Posted by: Ombudsman1 | September 7, 2009 6:20 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company