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1) E.J. Dionne imagines a saner world, where the public option is a centrist proposal.

2) He also imagines a world where charities aren't being huge jerks.

3) Back in this world, the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities thinks the charities are doing a lot of lying.

4) What killed California's health-care reform plan?

5) Matt Yglesias does some on-the-ground reporting on the Swedish health-care system.

I'll be on MSNBC's Morning Meeting with Dylan Ratigan tomorrow. It'll be 9-10:30 a.m. Eastern, but you probably know that by now.

By Ezra Klein  |  October 1, 2009; 6:40 PM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: The Public Option Compromises: An Interview With Sen. Tom Carper
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Comments

A "charity" is a specific type of foundation which is working for the welfare of some broad segment of the public. Most foundations are not charities, but tax shelters whose business model is beard pulling. Make them pay for health care!!

Posted by: bmull | October 1, 2009 7:13 PM | Report abuse

Rau's article doesn't match with my experience on the California health care fight. What killed it was that it didn't offer affordable coverage. Period. I think the bill got 1 vote in the Senate Health Committee, and entirely for that reason. There was no element of Republican fearmongering or middle-of-the-road centrist Dems succumbing to it that has characterized the national debate. What's more, even if it passed the Legislature none of the funding could have, because of the little minority rule setup we have here. So that would have gone to the ballot. It's a completely different dynamic and I don't think any lessons can or should be learned from it.

Posted by: dday212 | October 1, 2009 7:18 PM | Report abuse

Public Option – come on Ezra, many people rightly think this is the transitional step to single player.

“The public option also uses government exactly as advocates of market economics say it should be deployed: not as a controlling entity but as a nudge toward greater competition.”

Which “advocates of market economics” think this exactly?

Posted by: kingstu01 | October 1, 2009 7:21 PM | Report abuse

Does "affordable coverage" mean having someone else pay? I think we should distinguish between making something "affordable" and shifting the cost to someone else.

Posted by: kingstu01 | October 1, 2009 7:25 PM | Report abuse

dday212: "What killed it was that it didn't offer affordable coverage. Period."

I do think the Cali experience is relevant, because they found that offering affordable coverage through universal mandate and subsidies was a lot more expensive than anyone thought. And find this too we shall.

Posted by: bmull | October 1, 2009 7:28 PM | Report abuse

“If even groups whose very mission is public-spirited can't take an exceedingly modest risk to extend health coverage, how can we expect anybody else to pay a little more for a moral imperative?”

Is Dionne kidding here? Does he not understand that some people don’t think our government is a good steward of our money?

I have a novel idea…pay for healthcare out of the existing federal budget. I know it’s a lot to ask Congress to live on $3.5 TRILLION but perhaps they could cut back somewhere else.


Posted by: kingstu01 | October 1, 2009 7:34 PM | Report abuse

"I have a novel idea…pay for healthcare out of the existing federal budget. I know it’s a lot to ask Congress to live on $3.5 TRILLION but perhaps they could cut back somewhere else."

Like imperial adventures overseas?

Posted by: PeterH1 | October 1, 2009 9:30 PM | Report abuse

bmull - I don't know that it was that expensive, it was all play money anyway since the financing wasn't part of the bill - it was always going to have to go to the ballot. Schwarzenegger offered such meager subsidies that Senate Democrats wouldn't go along with it. Fabian Nunez, the suck-up Speaker of the Assembly, did, but he probably couldn't have gotten it through his chamber.

Posted by: dday212 | October 1, 2009 10:08 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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