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Pro-health-reform groups outspend opponents

Aaron David and Ben Pershing report:

The battle of the airwaves has already seen more than $150 million spent this year on television ads related to the health-care debate, according to the Campaign Media Analysis Group. As of Friday, about $63 million had been spent on ads favoring Democrats' reform plans and $52 million on ads opposed, according to the analysis group.

This is, in large part, evidence of something that was far more important for health-care reform than friendly ads: Industry stakeholders never joined the opposition.

By Ezra Klein  |  November 10, 2009; 9:15 AM ET
 
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Comments

The anti side doesn't need to spend as much money when the media covers its astroturf protests for free, an entire "news" network is devoted to opposing reform, and opponents outnumber supporters by a large factor as guests on interview shows.

Posted by: redwards95 | November 10, 2009 9:24 AM | Report abuse

redwards,

how much does MSNBC charge to cover the "pro" reform rallies held by HCAN and moveon.org if as you say Fox doesn't charge at all???

and as far as Fox goes they do from what i can tell have democratic strategists on their programs (at least when the White House allows it). THey have as many democratic strategists as MSNBC has Republican strategists on their shows.

Posted by: visionbrkr | November 10, 2009 10:00 AM | Report abuse

"Industry stakeholders never joined the opposition."

Because they were bought off in backroom deals......

Posted by: Chris_ | November 10, 2009 10:01 AM | Report abuse

"Industry stakeholders never joined the opposition."

Because they were bought off in backroom deals......

Exactly. Check the contributions made by the health insurance lobbying. Obama, Waxman, Dingell and others cleaned up while their supporters decried the small contributions made to their opponents.

Posted by: cprferry | November 10, 2009 11:36 AM | Report abuse

That's a lot of money that could have been spent actually helping people in need pay for healthcare services.

Posted by: fallsmeadjc | November 10, 2009 10:42 PM | Report abuse

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