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Tab dump

1) The brain's response to junk food is similar to its response to heroin.

2) Rahm is getting more involved in financial regulation.

3) A photo essay of the final days of Gourmet magazine.

4) Nothing makes me angrier than deficit hawks trying to repeal or reduce the estate tax.

5) Opening a coffee shop is really hard.

Recipe of the day: Most people think of radishes as a salad ingredient, but my dinner tonight is going to be thickly sliced farmer's market radishes with fresh butter on good bread topped with a generous sprinkling of salt. It won't look as good as these pictures, but it'll be a similar general idea.

By Ezra Klein  |  November 2, 2009; 6:38 PM ET
 
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Comments

I like a bowl of boiled diced beets, with a bit of vinegar. Very refreshing.

Posted by: bdballard | November 2, 2009 6:51 PM | Report abuse

I happen to agree that "Nothing makes me angrier than deficit hawks trying to repeal or reduce the estate tax." Few folks have $3,500,000 estates to pass to their children: those who have more should expect to pay a hefty tax upon their death.

The original intent behind the estate tax was to force children of wealthy parents to work: Jefferson [Thomas] advocated a 100% estate tax.

I'm far less convinced that Kessler's work regarding junk food is as credible as he'd have us all believe.

Posted by: rmgregory | November 2, 2009 6:55 PM | Report abuse

Yes, and wheat is quite potentially addictive as well.

http://tinyurl.com/yhhu83o

Posted by: sbguy | November 2, 2009 7:43 PM | Report abuse

You're having radishes and bread for dinner? What did you do, move to a monastery?

Posted by: tyromania | November 2, 2009 9:46 PM | Report abuse

"You're having radishes and bread for dinner? What did you do, move to a monastery?"

best laugh of the day!


thanks for the poignant photo essay on the last day of "gourmet" magazine.
it is always a sad mystery how the sum of hard work and countless memories ends up fitting in just a few cardboard boxes.

Posted by: jkaren | November 2, 2009 10:53 PM | Report abuse

I'm kinda hoping that's not all you're eating. Where's the protein?? And frankly...radishes on bread? sort of effete.

Posted by: LindaB1 | November 2, 2009 11:10 PM | Report abuse

Why are these idiots touching reducing the estate tax? They ought to increase the tax; push the effective rate above 50% or even 75%.

The inheritors of these estates get great educations, business connections, and vast arrays of opportunities. Why should such largess simply be bestowed upon those who have not earned it? So they need not have their own futures destroyed by companies like Enron, Worldcom, CitiGroup, Bear Stearns, and AIG?

Maybe if these dumb, rich kids faced the same risk that the typical young person did, real reform and protection for the median earner would more rapidly come to being.

Posted by: bcbulger | November 2, 2009 11:10 PM | Report abuse

Sorry, but I believe at a philosophical level, its un-American for the gov't to confescate half of private property at a person's death. Lets remember that the money earned has been taxed over a lifetime. Double taxation is unfair. Now, from a practical level, it seems to me going to the 2009 levels, and then indexing for inflation is the appropriate way to handle this.

Posted by: truth5 | November 3, 2009 9:49 AM | Report abuse

*, its un-American for the gov't to confescate half of private property at a person's death. *

The taxes do not even approach anywhere near half of an estate.

*Lets remember that the money earned has been taxed over a lifetime. Double taxation is unfair.*

Any assets inherited are not subject to capital gains taxes when they are sold. Estate taxes fill in for both a tax on the heirs when they receive money as well as an accounting for the capital gains on those assets which were never assessed because the gains were never realized until the death of the owner.

Posted by: constans | November 3, 2009 10:06 AM | Report abuse

--"Nothing makes me angrier than deficit hawks trying to repeal or reduce the estate tax."--

What DO you call someone so obsessed with other people's money?

Posted by: msoja | November 3, 2009 11:51 AM | Report abuse

The recipe for radishes with butter and salt on a baguette is good but i recommend cutting up the radish greens and sprinkling it on top of the radish slices, butter, salt, and bread. The green offer a nice contrast in taste. Enjoy

Posted by: mlgillman1 | November 4, 2009 12:02 AM | Report abuse

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