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The filibuster is popular

A new CNN poll shows that a majority of Americans support the filibuster, though it's not nearly as lopsided a majority as I would have expected.

By Ezra Klein  |  November 19, 2009; 9:09 AM ET
Categories:  Polls  
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Comments

Only 56% of Americans support the filibuster, however, falling short of the 60% supermajority needed to truly support the filibuster.

Posted by: MrMe1 | November 19, 2009 9:53 AM | Report abuse

Now poll them on if they support the unprecedented use of the filibuster on virtually all legislation.

Posted by: adamiani | November 19, 2009 10:13 AM | Report abuse

And for extra credit, can you name one example of it being used (which you agreed with).

Posted by: leoklein | November 19, 2009 10:36 AM | Report abuse

"As you may know, the filibuster is a Senate procedure which has been used to prevent the Senate from passing controversial legislation or confirming controversial appointments by the President, even if a majority of senators support that action. A vote of at least sixty senators out of one hundred is needed to end a filibuster. Do you favor or oppose the use of the filibuster in the U.S. Senate?"

And anyone of us could phrase a question about the R's use of the filibuster that would garner a majority. It's all about framing.

Posted by: DaffyDuck2 | November 19, 2009 12:18 PM | Report abuse

I note that the wording of the question says to prevent "controversial appointments" or "controversial legislation." Given that the filibuster is now being used routinely it seems the question skirts the situation that is now taking place.

Posted by: evan500 | November 19, 2009 12:35 PM | Report abuse

Ezra,

Look at the wording of the CNN question:

"As you may know, the filibuster is a Senate procedure which has been used to prevent the Senate from passing controversial legislation or confirming controversial appointments..."

Hardly unbiased wording. Many people are skittish about supporting "controversial" legislation and appointments.

Posted by: RichardHSerlin | November 20, 2009 12:59 AM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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