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Think tank

1) A 2008 Congressional Research Service report that will tell you all you ever wanted to know about the budget reconciliation process, and then a bit more even than that.

2) Gary Gorton -- who helped construct AIG's risk model but whose analysis I've found very helpful for understanding the financial crisis -- has a new paper that uses a Q&A format to guide you through the mess.

3) President Obama's health-care proposal, which is really more like President Obama's proposal for changes that should be made to the Senate health bill.

4) Three experts try to quantify exactly how much a competitive insurance exchange will be worth to people.

5) A recent experiment suggests that taxing unhealthful food makes a bigger difference than lowering the price of healthful food.

By Ezra Klein  |  March 1, 2010; 12:02 PM ET
 
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Comments

Ezra,
Can you tell if President Obama supports a single, national exchange similar to that in the House bill or separate state exchanges as in the Senate bill? I've seen commentators with different views on this issue.
I'm particularly wondering about how risk pooling will be handled in the President's proposal.

Posted by: bpatnaik | March 1, 2010 12:21 PM | Report abuse

Bpatnaik asks the central question about the viability of this particular reform.

But...

There is only one single political question that matters for reform.

One.

Eric Cantor made a desperate attempt to assert and settle the answer to the question.

It's the only question that matters to *most* swing voters, and thus to the election.

http://findingourdream.blogspot.com/2010/02/eric-cantor-fingers-key-sticking-point.html

Posted by: HalHorvath | March 1, 2010 12:37 PM | Report abuse

Also, does Republican support for allowing insurance companies to sell policies "across state lines" mean they're in favor of a national exchange instead of state exchanges? How would companies be allowed to sell across state lines if there were separate exchanges in each state?

Posted by: bpatnaik | March 1, 2010 12:47 PM | Report abuse

--"5) A recent experiment suggests that taxing unhealthful food makes a bigger difference than lowering the price of healthful food."--

I bet outlawing "unhealthy" food and letting the police enforce said laws with aggression would make a "bigger difference" than allowing people to live as free individuals, too.

Posted by: msoja | March 1, 2010 1:21 PM | Report abuse

A competitive national exchange is a great idea. Too bad the Democrats loaded it up by mandating bloated benefits packages and unaffordable subsidies.

Posted by: bgmma50 | March 1, 2010 1:24 PM | Report abuse

"A recent experiment suggests that taxing unhealthful food makes a bigger difference than lowering the price of healthful food.'

How about we don't force taxpayers to subsidize treatment for Type II Diabetes and let the fat people eat whatever they want to in peace?

Posted by: bgmma50 | March 1, 2010 1:25 PM | Report abuse

@bgmma50:

How about we don't force taxpayers to subsidize agri-corporations and their endless promotion and production of foods that are killing us all (even the skinny people and Republicans)?

Posted by: onewing1 | March 1, 2010 2:58 PM | Report abuse

--"How about we don't force taxpayers to subsidize agri-corporations and their endless promotion and production of foods that are killing us all (even the skinny people and Republicans)?"--

See, it's not so hard. Just like all the meddling in health care drives up health care costs and distorts the health care market, all the meddling in agriculture drives up food prices and provides all sorts of disincentives that are contrary to what free people would choose for themselves.

Extend the principle to Education, Labor, Commerce, Housing... and then you're talking REAL hope and change, instead of that commie double speak.

Posted by: msoja | March 1, 2010 5:44 PM | Report abuse

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
 
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