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Poll: Americans want to ‘give the new health-care law a chance’

on_hcr,_should_a_candidate_.png

Speaking of health-care reform, David Weigel catches an interesting health-care question in the new Wall Street Journal/NBC poll. It asks, "would you be more likely to vote for a candidate for Congress who says we should give the new health care law a chance to work and make changes as needed, or a candidate for Congress who says we should repeal the new health care law entirely and start over?"

The answer? Fifty-five percent say we should give the bill a chance. Forty-two percent say we should start over.

When health care passed, I, along with many other people, predicted that it would become more popular in the months after its passage. That prediction hasn't held up. But at the same time, "implement and modify" has routinely hammered "repeal and replace" in the polls. It's not so much that the bill got more popular as that the country seems to have decided that having come this far, we might as well give it a chance.

By Ezra Klein  |  May 13, 2010; 2:32 PM ET
Categories:  Health Reform , Polls  
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Comments

"The answer? Fifty-five percent say we should give the bill a chance. Forty-two percent say we should start over."

I think we should give it a chance. But certainly I'm not the only person whose going to vote for a candidate irrespective of whether or not they want to repeal it or give it a chance. There's other pending legislation that's more of a concern.

Posted by: Kevin_Willis | May 13, 2010 2:43 PM | Report abuse

Like Pelosi said, we have to pass it to know what's in it. It's so big and complicated no one can really know what's in it until it starts to get implemented. Only then will we know enough about it to decide how good or bad it is.

Posted by: rjewett | May 13, 2010 2:57 PM | Report abuse

It looks like it's going to come down to turn out. I'm in the scap it camp and staying there. This is what makes me think it will come down to turn out. Only 17% of peole think it will improve care and 76% are somewhat will to vote against the people who don't agree with them on HCR. If more people against HCR turn out the dems are in trouble.
And from what you have heard about Barack Obama's health care plan, do you believe it will result in the
quality of your health care getting better, worse, or staying about the same as now? If you do not have an
opinion, please just say so.
Quality will get better 17%
Quality will get worse 36 %
Quality will stay the same 37%
Do not have an opinion 9%

And, if a candidate for Congress from your district has a position on the new health care law that differs from
your own, how likely is it that this particular difference ALONE would determine your vote on election day
this November? (READ CHOICES)
5/10
Extremely likely 21%
Very likely 19%
Somewhat likely 36%
Not very likely 21%
Not sure 3%

Posted by: obrier2 | May 13, 2010 3:06 PM | Report abuse

"Give it a chance to work and make changes as needed" is loaded phrasing.

Rasmussen has repeal favored by 56% to 37%.

Posted by: ath17 | May 13, 2010 3:08 PM | Report abuse

while I agree that repeal won't ever happen (would Medicare ever be repealed? NO) I think that over time people will come to have MORE issues with it rather than less.

Dems sold it as a wonderful thing (which it is) but the moment something goes wrong and it absolutely will and already has to an extent they'll be crucified by anyone that feels the slightest inkling AGAINST the law.

I personally see this every day with my clients when they ask me about the law. I try to tell them that its good for them (in NJ the mandate should really help) but they don't want to hear it.

Maybe they're listening to too much Glenn Beck.

Posted by: visionbrkr | May 13, 2010 3:14 PM | Report abuse

obrier2 above comments about turnout, which does seem to be a key issue. Some polls are showing that Amendment of HCR is a factor which drives opponents of the Social-Democrat party to the polls in droves, while not significantly modifying the voting choices of independents. Depending upon your loyalties, this could be good news or bad.

A university in Iowa now has a course teaching attorneys how to litigate aspects of the PPACA on behalf of clients -- as attorneys become increasingly involved, things will become even more interesting.

Posted by: rmgregory | May 13, 2010 3:31 PM | Report abuse

All polls with this binary response (repeal it/don't) are seriously flawed because they don't ask people WHY they want the bill repealed. Specifically, I'd imagine that some percentage of "repeal" are single payor advocates or others who think HCR didn't go far enough. Don't repeal likely includes voters who HATE HCR but think any re-do will be "worse."

Posted by: mkindc | May 13, 2010 3:53 PM | Report abuse

rjewett, that quote's certainly gained a "...before I voted against it.”-style popularity w/ the right.

trouble is, if you actually took 2 minutes to read what she was saying, you'd see that it didn't mean "omg this is so freaking complicated, i think we should just pass it and see what happens!" it was about the "fog" that prevents people from actually discussing the merits of the thing (ie, you)

http://mediamatters.org/blog/201004070046

Posted by: Chris_ | May 13, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

"When health care passed, I, along with many other people, predicted that it would become more popular in the months after its passage. That prediction hasn't held up."

Yeah, because close to a thousand people a week are still dying from lack of health care due to having no insurance. And nothing is going to change that over the next 4 years.

Easy to assume when you have a good job with health insurance. But most common people know someone who is dying from, or has died from lack of access to health care because they lack insurance.

When people continue to die needlessly, what is there to cheer about? It's kind of like cheering on a war that will kill 50,000 Americans a year, and expecting it to be popular, knowing that it will be over in 4 years.

People inside the bubble need to climb out of their ivory towers and walk among the unwashed to gauge public perceptions, instead of listening to the echo.

Posted by: jc263field | May 13, 2010 5:22 PM | Report abuse

People inside the bubble need to climb out of their ivory towers and walk among the unwashed to gauge public perceptions, instead of listening to the echo.

The amount a bill actually helps "the great unwashed" is inversely proportional to its popularity in congress and with likely voters, who tend to be whiter, richer, and more conservative than either the great unwashed or the population in general. Congress listens first to their paymasters (lobbyists, pacs, the oligarchs), then to likely voters (described above), and last to "the great unwashed", ie the people that need their help the most.

Posted by: srw3 | May 13, 2010 5:32 PM | Report abuse

Seems to me that if about 40% won't vote for Democrats no matter what, and if there's a likely overlap between that population and the 42% who say they want to "start over" on health care reform, then the moderates are in play on this issue.

Posted by: dasimon | May 14, 2010 12:49 AM | Report abuse

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