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How's that energy bill coming?

Kate Sheppard reports:

"We're really not at the point where I can determine what I think is best for the caucus," Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) told reporters following the meeting, when asked if there were any new details on the package, which they are supposed to start debating next week. Reid also noted that they haven't yet drawn any Republicans to work on a package. "Everyone is focusing all the attention on us. We're trying to find a Republican or two or three. … We haven't given up on that."

Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.) told reporters that they spent about five minutes on the subject of an energy package. Reid walked them through several options on a bill, one with a carbon cap and one without it, and gave senators more time to think about it.

By Ezra Klein  |  July 21, 2010; 1:43 PM ET
Categories:  Climate Change  
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Comments

"We're really not at the point where I can determine what I think is best for the caucus,"

I like that phrase, best for the caucus. Usually, lawmakers at least pretend to talk about what's best for the country, but apparently the mask slipped for Reid here just a bit.

Posted by: jfcarro | July 21, 2010 2:09 PM | Report abuse

Polls regularly show that Americans, including Republicans, overwhelmingly support "energy reform." A majority also agrees that climate change is real and needs to be addressed. And large majorities support increasing "energy independence" and "alternative energy".

Energy legislation isn't stalled in the Senate because Americans oppose it. It's stalled because oil companies and utilities oppose aspects of it. These companies give massively to politicians of both parties, not just Republicans. That is the problem.

We already have wasted 8 years under President Bush failing to enact energy and climate reform, and, prospects for enacting such reform after November are unlikely to be greater than they are now.

Hey Members of Congress: Man Up! ACT NOW!!!

Posted by: paul65 | July 21, 2010 2:43 PM | Report abuse

I can't wait until Republicans take over the House in November. We no longer will have to worry about quaint problems like the planet warming.

All our energy will be consumed by 2 years of "investigations" into Obama's "true place of birth," followed by impeachment (of America's first black President).

Posted by: paul65 | July 21, 2010 2:48 PM | Report abuse

The problem with energy reform reminds me of an Onion headline a while back - something like "99% of Commuters Favor Carpooling For Everyone Else".

Voters want every one else to stop using cheap fossil fuels. They also want every one else's congressman to stop earmarking pork.

Posted by: eggnogfool | July 21, 2010 3:55 PM | Report abuse

Yeah, us Americans just can't wait for the next huge federal tax increase. Personally I'm really excited about the fact that Obama's prediction of skyrocketing electricity costs come true.

How cool will it be to pay a fortune for energy so that hucksters and hoaxers can enrich themselves.

Among the new green technology that Americans will adopt is the washboard. After all it will simply be wrong to use a machine to clean our clothes, right?

why won't the liberals just leave us alone?

Posted by: skipsailing28 | July 21, 2010 4:22 PM | Report abuse

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