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Reconciliation

Recap: The case against reforming Social Security; the deficit commission's legislators tilt right; and Charlie Crist's campaign strategy is to withhold the most important information voters can have.

Elsewhere:

1) The crisis in customer service.

2) How the stimulus is changing America.

3) Ten reasons not to raise the Social Security retirement age.

4) I'll be on "Countdown With Keith Olbermann" tonight talking Social Security, Joe Miller and anything else he throws at me.

Recipe of the day: How to make a good gin rickey.

By Ezra Klein  |  August 30, 2010; 6:39 PM ET
 
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Next: Wonkbook: More jobs bills; Wall Street turns on Obama; the calorie information cometh

Comments

Ezra, I watched your segment on Countdown tonight and was wondering if you agree with the viewpoints concerning the long term viability of Social Security that Lawrence O'Donnell was putting forth. It was more like you were sitting with Alan Simpson than someone who I would have expected to be better informed. What he was saying seemed to fly in the face of everything that I thought I knew about Social Security.

His earlier guest from the Older Women's League seemed to be taken aback by his comments that Social Security likely will not be there for people who are currently in their 20's and 30's.

Posted by: mikemfr | August 30, 2010 8:42 PM | Report abuse

Ezra,

What is the current age for retirement to receive Social Security?

Do you think your readers know this?

Or do you think that the general population thinks Retirement at Age 65 is the rule?

On the Social Security web site it says right at the top in big, bold letters:


Your full retirement age is 66.


So perhaps instead of saying Social Security retirement age is slated to increase, you might say, Social Security has ALREADY increased the retirement age to 66 from 65.

And the retirement age is slated to increase to 67. For everyone born in 1960 or later your full retirement age is 67.

It isn't slated to increase. It already has increased.

Posted by: grooft | August 30, 2010 8:44 PM | Report abuse

I too saw you on MSNBC and I have to say I'm beginning to worry about our mainstream media. Since when did the powers to be forget to debrief someone before allowing them to address the entire nation on such a volatile issue.You'd better be careful about getting on national T.V. and telling the truth!You know they murdered "Jesus" for that.All sarcasm aside I'm impressed with your candor and unmitigated gaul.You remind me of a famous "Dragnet" line , "Just the facts Sir". And how you didn't spin the issue to benefit either side of the false dichotomy,or disavow information in order to appease a certian constituent. Sir ,I've read a little bit of your work, but,to be sure if in the future I don't feel like I'm getting all the facts on any issue,I'll be sure to see if you've done a piece on it.GOOD JOB !!!!!

Posted by: ed_sanders33 | August 31, 2010 1:44 AM | Report abuse

The primary problem with social security is the massive windfall it provides to low income and 1 income households.

Posted by: krazen1211 | August 31, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

Great present value calculations on Social Security here.

http://www.urban.org/publications/900746.html

Posted by: krazen1211 | August 31, 2010 12:02 PM | Report abuse

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