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Brazil's breadbasket

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In less than 30 years Brazil has turned itself from a food importer into one of the world’s great breadbaskets. It is the first country to have caught up with the traditional “big five” grain exporters (America, Canada, Australia, Argentina and the European Union). It is also the first tropical food-giant; the big five are all temperate producers.

Here's how they did it.

By Ezra Klein  |  September 1, 2010; 1:57 PM ET
Categories:  Food  
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Comments

Public Radio's "Living on Earth" recently had a nice piece that explored "Soylandia", Brazil's vast savanna and croplands: http://www.loe.org/shows/shows.htm?programID=10-P13-00029#feature3

Posted by: meander510 | September 1, 2010 2:17 PM | Report abuse

Great story. Great link.

Posted by: BHeffernan1 | September 1, 2010 2:35 PM | Report abuse

It's tempting to speculate that the boom in agriculture in the cerrado has helped marginalize the few but immensely destructive Amazonian ranchers, allowing Lula's government to cut the subsidies that keep them in business. However the continuing power of America's parallel sugar farmers warns against over-optimism.

Posted by: JamesWimberley | September 1, 2010 6:13 PM | Report abuse

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