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Monday NBER papers: Workplace inequality, the power of kindergarten, and poor health makes you poor

Inequality at Work: The Effect of Peer Salaries on Job Satisfaction,” by David Card, Alexandre Mas, Enrico Moretti and Emmanuel Saez:

Economists have long speculated that individuals care about both their absolute income and their income relative to others. ... A randomly chosen subset of employees of the University of California was informed about a new web site listing the pay of all University employees. All employees were then surveyed about their job satisfaction and job search intentions. ... We find an asymmetric response to the information treatment: workers with salaries below the median for their pay unit and occupation report lower pay and job satisfaction, while those earning above the median report no higher satisfaction. Likewise, below-median earners report a significant increase in the likelihood of looking for a new job, while above-median earners are unaffected.

How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence From Project STAR,” by Raj Chetty, John N. Friedman, Nathaniel Hilger, Emmanuel Saez, Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach and Danny Yagan:

In Project STAR, 11,571 students in Tennessee and their teachers were randomly assigned to different classrooms within their schools from kindergarten to third grade. This paper evaluates the long-term impacts of STAR using administrative records. We obtain five results. First, kindergarten test scores are highly correlated with outcomes such as earnings at age 27, college attendance, home ownership, and retirement savings. Second, students in small classes are significantly more likely to attend college, attend a higher-ranked college, and perform better on a variety of other outcomes. Class size does not have a significant effect on earnings at age 27, but this effect is imprecisely estimated. Third, students who had a more experienced teacher in kindergarten have higher earnings. Fourth, an analysis of variance reveals significant kindergarten class effects on earnings. Higher kindergarten class quality – as measured by classmates' end-of-class test scores – increases earnings, college attendance rates, and other outcomes. Finally, the effects of kindergarten class quality fade out on test scores in later grades but gains in non-cognitive measures persist. We conclude that early childhood education has substantial long-term impacts, potentially through non-cognitive channels. Our analysis suggests that improving the quality of schools in disadvantaged areas may reduce poverty and raise earnings and tax revenue in the long run.

The Asset Cost of Poor Health,” by James M. Poterba, Steven F. Venti and David A. Wise:

This paper examines the correlation between poor health and asset accumulation for households in the first nine waves of the Health and Retirement Survey. Rather than enumerating the specific costs of poor health, such as out of pocket medical expenses or lost earnings, we estimate how the evolution of household assets is related to poor health ... Our estimates suggest large and substantively important correlations between poor health and asset accumulation. We compare persons in each 1992 asset quintile who were in the top third of the 1992 distribution of latent health with those in the same 1992 asset quintile who were in the bottom third of the latent health distribution. By 2008, those in the top third of the health distribution had accumulated, on average, more than 50 percent more assets than those in the bottom third of the health distribution. This “asset cost of poor health” appears to be larger for persons with substantial 1992 asset balances than for those with lower balances.

By Ezra Klein  | September 27, 2010; 12:20 PM ET
Categories:  Economics  
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Comments

inequality
http://elsa.berkeley.edu/~saez/card-mas-moretti-saez10ucpay.pdf

Kindergarten (slides)

http://obs.rc.fas.harvard.edu/chetty/STAR_slides.pdf


asset cost

http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/transmit/rrc2010/papers/5b%20PVW_FINAL.pdf

Posted by: bdballard | September 27, 2010 12:32 PM | Report abuse

"This paper examines the correlation between poor health and asset accumulation for households in the first nine waves of the Health and Retirement Survey."

So in otherwords, if you're often sick it's hard to earn/save money? I guess that's not too surprising.

"workers with salaries below the median for their pay unit and occupation report lower pay and job satisfaction, while those earning above the median report no higher satisfaction. Likewise, below-median earners report a significant increase in the likelihood of looking for a new job, while above-median earners are unaffected."

If you find out you aren't paid as much as the guy who sits next to you, you are less than thrilled and think about leaving? Not all too surprising either.

Posted by: justin84 | September 27, 2010 12:51 PM | Report abuse

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