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Markets in things that don't sound true

From XKCD:

the_economic_argument.png

By Ezra Klein  | October 20, 2010; 10:40 AM ET
 
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Comments

Can't we add supply-side economics to that list?

Posted by: klautsack | October 20, 2010 10:56 AM | Report abuse

And then keep shelling Science and denying scientific facts.....

What an absurd country in the world. Probably everywhere in the world Humanity is flocking to Science and investment in Science, Technology and Education. USA may be the only place where we would have so much disdain for these things even when we know that S&T has been delivering and more importantly our future livelihood depends on that.

Posted by: umesh409 | October 20, 2010 11:09 AM | Report abuse

Talk about assuming your conclusions!

For starters, "ruthlessly profit-focused" and "terminally stupid" or "terminally prejudiced" aren't mutually exclusive.

Posted by: vorkosigan1 | October 20, 2010 11:19 AM | Report abuse

As Henry Ford once said, "Millionaires don't use astrology - billionaires do." I know someone who specializes in astrological business and market consulting, and he's doing quite well, thank you. But please, don't let your gut instincts get in the way of accuracy!

Posted by: uberblonde1 | October 20, 2010 11:35 AM | Report abuse

You know, I saw that earlier this morning and thought, "Wait a minute, widespread adoption of aura reading wouldn't reduce health care costs, it would just set up another niche, like the one for MRI centers. I wonder what Ezra Klein would think?"

Posted by: JonFD | October 20, 2010 11:36 AM | Report abuse

Can't you preserve the alt-text when you import xkcd?

Posted by: rusty_spatula | October 20, 2010 11:44 AM | Report abuse

uberblonde, that topic is addressed in the original comment, via the hover-over text.

Posted by: djw12 | October 20, 2010 11:54 AM | Report abuse

klautsack @ October 20, 2010 10:56 AM wrote "Can't we add supply-side economics to that list?"

Actually supply-side economic works, for some industries. They are heavily aided by advertising - creating a demand for a product that someone with deep pockets decided to sell.

Posted by: AMviennaVA | October 20, 2010 12:31 PM | Report abuse

djw12, that's exactly what I was going to say. That a huckster is successful and bilking rubes does not mean that they're not selling snake oil (this sentence brought to you by the 1800s).

Posted by: MosBen | October 20, 2010 12:36 PM | Report abuse

I'd add to this, if Intelligent Design/Creationism were really a theory even half of scientists subscribed to, even just 10% subscribed to, then wouldn't at least a few bio-tech, medical research, or pharmaceutical companies be hiring a few ID-scientists or touting their remarkable research based on the idea that or appendix is a gift from God and that lower back pain isn't an evolutionary leftover but the designer's way of punishing us for our sins.

Posted by: ogvor | October 20, 2010 12:59 PM | Report abuse

Relativity and QED do not belong on that list. And not just because companies are making money off them.

Posted by: pneogy | October 20, 2010 4:20 PM | Report abuse

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