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Reconciliation

Recap: The five people Obama should hire now; why we need to stop treating the deficit like a second-grad math problem; and my case for Don Draper's decisions.

Elsewhere:

1) The principles behind this AEI paper on controlling health-care costs don't sound particularly distant from the health-reform law.

2) I still have to write my post on the individual mandate and constitutionality. In the meantime, read this.

3) How to save even more money on infrastructure.

4) How aging populations will change the world.

5) I'll be talking stimulus hypocrisy with Keith Olbermann tonight.

Recipe of the day: I can't stop thinking about these cheddar-and-apple scones. Must. Make.

By Ezra Klein  | October 18, 2010; 6:04 PM ET
 
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Comments

Judge Henry Hudson (Eastern District, VA) to Ian Gershengorn (Justice Department Attorney) during oral arguments earlier today: "Why did the members of Congress and the President deny to everyone in America it was a tax?" "They [the President and Congress] denied it's a tax. The President did. Was he trying to deceive the people?"

Good questions!

By the way, three Democratic Governors today joined the fight for freedom from Obamacare: Governor Bill Ritter is the latest patriotic Democrat to formally join the freedom fighters.

Posted by: rmgregory | October 18, 2010 6:54 PM | Report abuse

Ezra, I don't know if you've seen this yet, but I think you (and the others mentioned) need to address the following challenge:

http://www.dailyhowler.com/dh101510.shtml

Posted by: Joel19 | October 18, 2010 7:20 PM | Report abuse

Why is it legal for states to require auto insurance as a condition of getting a driver's license, but illegal for the Federal government to require that all citizens have health insurance? Is public health not part of public safety?

Public health laws allow quarantining anyone with a deadly infectious disease, like plague, as part of public safety. No individuals — no matter how Libertarian — has the right to endanger others.

Laws also prohibit playing Russian Roulette which — with regard to not having health care coverage — is but a slower form of suicide.

We can't stop some people from willfully endangering themselves, but we can at least require that they help pay for dealing with the results.

The Preamble to the Constitution speaks of "common Defence" and "general Welfare" as parts of its purpose in defining the new and necessary government the Constitution's authors were creating. I would think that modern universal health care coverage would fall comfortably within their visions and hopes for an uncertain future.

Posted by: tomcammarata | October 18, 2010 8:13 PM | Report abuse

--*http://www.dailyhowler.com/dh101510.shtml*--

I saw that, too, and wondered if Klein would address it, though I think Somerby's fury is built on a concocted platform of carefully chosen, yet shaky, timbers. He and Klein are both twisted in the same direction, but in very different ways, if that makes sense.

Still, it would be entertaining if Howler dude added Klein to his regularly examined list of buffoons and clowns (Matthews, Modo, Dooberman, etc., all of Klein's cohorts), though the way Somerby rambles around, setting him on another path might just make him all that more incomprehensible.

Posted by: msoja | October 18, 2010 11:40 PM | Report abuse

ps. I'll add that Somerby's "challenge" to Klein is somewhat misguided. Klein's offending post was just one of his toss offs. Propagandizing is a specialist field, now, and Klein doesn't have as much expertise to incompetently cover more than half a base or so. It might be nice (for some people) if Somerby could march all his lefty blogger ducks in a line, but he's going to have to run for office, and get elected, if he really wants to run other people's shows for them.

Posted by: msoja | October 18, 2010 11:49 PM | Report abuse

--*Why is it legal for states to require auto insurance as a condition of getting a driver's license, but illegal for the Federal government to require that all citizens have health insurance?*--

One is to protect *others* from one's negligence, and the other is ostensibly to protect oneself from one's own negligence.

Neither is *right*, however, no matter what convoluted justifications you dream up.

Posted by: msoja | October 18, 2010 11:57 PM | Report abuse

--*We can't stop some people from willfully endangering themselves, but we can at least require that they help pay for dealing with the results.*--

In the old days it was called "personal responsibility". When people made poor choices, the costs accrued were solely theirs.

Nowadays, it's all about getting some politically unpopular sucker to pick up the tab, while the peanut gallery wails and gnashes and wonders why so many more people seem unafraid of their own bad choices.

Posted by: msoja | October 19, 2010 12:04 AM | Report abuse


That is very true. But You can get always get a full medical coverage at the lowest price from http://bit.ly/9EwL4G if you do your home work you can find the best plan.

Posted by: willhood19 | October 19, 2010 6:31 AM | Report abuse

the scones are DELICIOUS!

Posted by: jashimberg | October 19, 2010 10:25 AM | Report abuse

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