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Posted at 5:00 PM ET, 11/19/2010

Commissions as stalling devices

By Ezra Klein

Jonathan Bernstein is even more pessimistic about deficit commissions than I am:

In this case, the Democrats didn't want to act (then) on the deficit -- quite correctly in my view, but regardless, they didn't want to act, and for understandable political reasons they didn't want to say that they didn't want to act. The purpose of the commission was to kick the can down the road until after the election. In that, it basically succeeded.

Of course, it's possible that one or more of the people who supported the commission believed that it would achieve a consensus that otherwise didn't exist. Perhaps even the president thought that. If so, they were foolish. Commissions can't do that.

By Ezra Klein  | November 19, 2010; 5:00 PM ET
 
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Comments

"The purpose of the commission was to kick the can down the road until after the election. In that, it basically succeeded."

Yep, that was the Obumbler's VERY transparent agenda. It is also another nail in his coffin.

Posted by: illogicbuster | November 20, 2010 12:05 PM | Report abuse

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