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Posted at 10:04 AM ET, 11/29/2010

The history of the two-party vote in one isarithmic visualization

By Ezra Klein

What's an "isarithmic visualization"? According to David Sparks, it's basically a map "wherein a third variable is represented in two dimensions by color, or by contour lines, indicating gradations." He made one tracking the two-party vote since 1920, and it's oddly beautiful. Remember that this is tracking change in the vote, not the total vote. So when the map turns red or blue, that means that Republicans or Democrats are gaining voters, not that they necessarily won those areas.

(Hat tip: Tech President.)

By Ezra Klein  | November 29, 2010; 10:04 AM ET
 
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Comments

In the 30s and the 60s the whole country was drifting (walking? running?) towards the Dems. During no period was the whole country moving towards the Rs. The intensity of the west and south going R in the 80s is interesting (although dark red looks more 'intense' than dark blue, so it's a little hard to compare). The consistency of the pattern over the last decade or so reflects the polarization growing - Rs are getting more R and Ds are getting more D.

Posted by: AronB | November 29, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

In the 30s and the 60s the whole country was drifting (walking? running?) towards the Dems. During no period was the whole country moving towards the Rs. The intensity of the west and south going R in the 80s is interesting (although dark red looks more 'intense' than dark blue, so it's a little hard to compare). The consistency of the pattern over the last decade or so reflects the polarization growing - Rs are getting more R and Ds are getting more D.

Posted by: AronB | November 29, 2010 4:46 PM | Report abuse

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