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Posted at 7:23 PM ET, 01/19/2011

Reconciliation

By Ezra Klein

Recap: Policy arguments aren't always on the level; the uninsured are too often forgotten in the health-care debate;

Elsewhere:

1) "Unemployment always rises more for less-educated workers in recessions and falls by more in booms."

2) So much pho.

3) Bloggers seem a lot better than professional analysts at predicting Apple's moves.

4) Top tips from Davos spouses.

Recipe of the day: Pho!

By Ezra Klein  | January 19, 2011; 7:23 PM ET
 
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Next: Wonkbook: House GOP votes to repeal, but not to replace

Comments

Wow, I am really excited. Someone besides me finally made the power of try-and-see argument for ending the filibuster.

Here’s Chait today:

"The bad news is that this move will allow a lot of right-wing legislation. The good news is that, eventually, it will allow liberal legislation that will gain public approval and stand the test of time better than right-wing legislation does."

at: http://www.tnr.com/blog/jonathan-chait/81829/republicans-learn-hate-the-filibuster

Here’s me in 2009:

The great good the Democrats would do with the filibuster eliminated – things like universal healthcare, or perhaps someday Medicare for all, free four years of college…once enacted, and people saw the truth of how good they were, as opposed to the Republican propaganda, would be permanent. The Republicans would never dare get rid of them, and if they did, it would be very temporary; next election, the Republicans would be decimated, and the programs would be restored easily…A good example is Medicare (universal single-payer health insurance, like in Canada and France, for our seniors). The Republicans, led by Ronald Reagan, fought it tooth and nail in 1965, claiming it would lead to socialism, or worse. Today they would not dare even mention repealing it, because once it was actually passed, people saw how much better it really made their lives, and loved it.

By contrast, the things the Republicans would push through with 51 votes would usually be bad, or horrible, to the vast majority, and so once people actually experienced them, and saw firsthand how the lies about them were really false, like how they, in fact, only helped the rich, they would not last. The public would vote for change, and they would be repealed, AND the Republicans would be revealed.

at:

http://richardhserlin.blogspot.com/2009/08/key-reason-why-51-democratic-senators.html

How about you Ezra?

Posted by: RichardHSerlin | January 19, 2011 10:04 PM | Report abuse

tips for the spouses at davos...
"Finally, inevitably, there’s live karaoke with Barry the piano man at the Piano Bar in the Tonic Hotel on the Promenade. At that point, the badges have disappeared, and everybody’s too drunk to care about status."


so nice to know what the shareholder money goes for.

Posted by: jkaren | January 20, 2011 12:11 AM | Report abuse

tips for the spouses at davos...
"Finally, inevitably, there’s live karaoke with Barry the piano man at the Piano Bar in the Tonic Hotel on the Promenade. At that point, the badges have disappeared, and everybody’s too drunk to care about status."

and then,
in a parallel universe,
there is this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxF0W2jsi3U

Posted by: jkaren | January 20, 2011 12:23 AM | Report abuse

more tips for the spouses, at davos.

"If you do happen to find yourself talking to Bill Clinton or Bono or Dmitry Medvedev, you’ll probably be part of a large crowd of people and the conversation is likely to be superficial at best. On the other hand, if you just sit down on a random couch in the Congress Center, there’s a really good chance that sitting next to you will be a fascinating and very useful person to know."

well, of course...where else would bill clinton be...than in davos.
i still remember his campaign video, of humble origins...in "a place called hope."

and what, i wonder, in this context, constitutes, "a very useful person to know?"
what makes a person, "useful" to know?

Posted by: jkaren | January 20, 2011 12:35 AM | Report abuse

"Plan outfits that will work with a large plastic card hanging right at boob height."

How tall *is* Klein, and why hasn't he burned a load of jet fuel to bring us the blow by blow?

--*what makes a person, "useful" to know?*--

Oh, you know, in case you need a special DeathCare waiver, or something, like 100+ companies and unions with connections have managed to wrangle for themselves. Ask Klein.

Posted by: msoja | January 20, 2011 8:11 AM | Report abuse

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