Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
Posted at 4:19 PM ET, 02/10/2011

Reminder: The nominations process is still broken

By Ezra Klein

From the inbox:

WASHINGTON – Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key Administration posts:

· Scott Gration, Ambassador to the Republic of Kenya, Department of State

· Marilyn A. Quagliotti, Deputy Director for Supply Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy

· Henry J. Aaron, Chair, Social Security Advisory Board

· Ana Margarita "Cha" Guzmán, Member, National Security Education Board

· Michael Guest, Member, National Security Education Board

Is there really a reason the full Senate needs to vote on each member of the National Security Education Board? Or the deputy directors of the Office of National Drug Control Policy? Couldn't they just vote on the director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy and leave it at that?

By Ezra Klein  | February 10, 2011; 4:19 PM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: Annualization matters
Next: The GOP's budget cuts in one table

Comments

My thought is a little different.

Why have a National Drug Control Policy Board or a National Security Education Board at all?

Posted by: johnmarshall5446 | February 10, 2011 4:36 PM | Report abuse

Yay for Henry J. Aaron!

Posted by: mschol17 | February 10, 2011 4:58 PM | Report abuse

Not sure about the Nat'l Drug Control Policy Board but the Nat'l Security Education Program seems pretty beneficial to me:
1. Scholarships to U.S. undergraduate students to study abroad in areas critical to U.S. national security.
2. Fellowships to U.S. graduate students to study languages and world regions critical to U.S. national security
3. Grants to U.S. institutions of higher education to develop programs of study in and about countries, languages and international fields critical to national security and under-represented in U.S. study.

Posted by: beellinor | February 10, 2011 4:59 PM | Report abuse

exactly what does a "Deputy Director for Supply Reduction of the Office of National Drug Control Policy" do other than carry a really long title?


How much are their budgets btw? I'm sure Rep. Boehner's looking into this but any help you could give Ezra would be great, THANKS!

On a more important queston does anyone really know how many of these agencies are out there? I know President Obama rightfully claimed he's going to streamline all this but will that really happen?

i'd be curious to know what the "DDFSROTOONCCP" really does in a day's work.

Posted by: visionbrkr | February 10, 2011 5:06 PM | Report abuse

beelinor:

I looked it up too. However there's nothing in the program that would require those students to work for the government in NS, and you can be certain that business wants those same students and will pay much more for them!

Posted by: johnmarshall5446 | February 10, 2011 5:23 PM | Report abuse

Fair enough. However, the streamlining of nominations for these obscure positions and debating their existence are two different debates. If these positions exist and are currently funded, then they should be stocked with the appropriate people ASAP, so that we can debate their usefulness.

Posted by: beellinor | February 10, 2011 5:37 PM | Report abuse

--*Is there really a reason the full Senate needs to vote on each member of the National Security Education Board?*--

That's our girl Klein, always at the ready to help the government be less accountable.

I say, if anyone wants to know who is on the National Security Education Board, let 'em file Freedom of Information Act requests!

Of course, a very much better thing would be to abolish such boards, altogether.

Posted by: msoja | February 10, 2011 6:13 PM | Report abuse

There are over 2000 positions needing Senate confirmation. That's just absurd. There's no way Senators can actually process that many nominations effectively. An administration needs to be up and running in 3 or 4 months, yet the nomination process makes that impossible.

Posted by: marvyT | February 10, 2011 6:42 PM | Report abuse

--*There are over 2000 positions needing Senate confirmation. That's just absurd.*--

Indeed it is. Eliminate about 98% of those positions and we might have a government that makes sense. No guarantee, of course, but maybe.

Posted by: msoja | February 10, 2011 7:03 PM | Report abuse

Is this limited by Article 2 Section 2? I would assume that some of the delegations would be unconstitutional without Senate approval, but I don't actually remember much about the difference between "Officers of the United States" and inferior officers, but I think unless the Board has a director, the Senate must vote on each member?

Posted by: DJeter1234 | February 11, 2011 12:34 AM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company