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Posted at 6:32 PM ET, 03/ 2/2011

Reconciliation

By Ezra Klein

Recap: We've gotten too comfortable with high unemployment; the two sides of the debate over state pension systems; and it's time for states to put up or shut up on health-care reform.

Elsewhere:

1) Voters vastly overestimate the influence that political actors have over all sorts of issues.

2) Republicans are taking aim at Medicaid.

3) Lots of information about "actuarial values" in health-care insurance (pdf).

4) Rob Pegoraro and Farhad Manjoo on the new iPad.

Recipe of the day: I really like roasted carrots.

By Ezra Klein  | March 2, 2011; 6:32 PM ET
 
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Next: Wonkbook: The White House gets off the bench

Comments

Ezra, I love the blog. I think it's informative, clever, always useful and ever insightful. And I think you show remarkable patience to put up with the pathological bitterness of the small-minded trolls who come here only to disagree with you.

But seriously. Roasted carrots are so bad they should be prosecuted in the Hague.

Posted by: strawman | March 2, 2011 7:19 PM | Report abuse

Ezra:

I know you don't read my comments, but you should. You'll get tomorrow's news today.

For instance this from Bill Gross today:


"Gross said critics of the Fed easing programs legitimately could ask whether the "policies actually heal, as opposed to cover up, symptoms of an unhealthy economy."

Interest rates, he said, are probably 1.50 percentage points too low—based on the benchmark 10-year Treasury yield compared to expected economic growth—and will gain once the Fed walks away.

The central bank, along with other sovereign entities in China, Japan and elsewhere, account for 60 percent of Treasury ownership. Since QE 2 has begun, the Fed has been responsible for 70 percent of all Treasury buys, Gross said.

"Who will buy Treasuries when the Fed doesn't?" he asked. "I don't know."

Who has been telling you this for MONTHS! (short Treasuries) from my post here on the public library computer. (got a brand new shopping car today, that makes three)

Also, if you look at your Borders comments from yesterday, you will find remarkably similar sentiments to those expressed today here:

"Cash-strapped states and the rapid advancement of e-books could spell the end to the public library over the next 10 years, turning the community institutions into kiosks at the local mall.

“A public library earns a measly couple of bucks on a long overdue book, an intra-day loan, sales of very outdated books, and from parties that hold instructional classes like defensive driving,” said Brian Sozzi, a retail analyst for Wall Street Strategies Inc. for six years. “On the liability side of the balance sheet, a public library shells out funds for the salaries of librarians and other staff, utilities, books, and various equipment.”

States are already cutting back hours drastically for public libraries. In 2010, 25 states reported a decrease in public library hours, with Ohio among the worst with a 63 percent cut in hours, according to a report by the American Library Association. A year before, just five states reported a decrease in total library hours."


Hey gotta go. They're flickering the lights, which means it's time to go out and pay the other homeless guy whose been watching my carts for the last couple of hours!


Posted by: johnmarshall5446 | March 2, 2011 8:17 PM | Report abuse

Hi, Ezra

Just heard you on the Rachel Maddow podcast, and you are the first I have come across in podcast or print, who has mentioned Japan's national health care system.

I have lived here in Japan 28 years and was disabled by a stroke almost six years ago. I now have 100% free medical care and even my motorized wheelchair is 90% subsidized. I have twice weekly rehab, free monthly checkups, and even get free subway transportation. I had a free CT scan a while back and instead of waiting hours, as it is supposed by the worriers in the U.S., the technician apologized after I sat there for no more than 15 minutes, even with no appointment.

I put into the health care insurance system for all those years and now am benefiting. (For those who are not disabled, there is a 30% co-pay.)

So THAT is what my fellow Americans might have reason to expect under a government-supported health care system. If it is done right.


Posted by: HBrumfield | March 2, 2011 9:22 PM | Report abuse

After what seemed like a lifetime of thirty-Year adjustable-rate mortgages, with monthly mortgage payments going up all the time, The "123 Mortgage Refinance" helped me to lock in a great low fixed rate of 3.16%, helping me to guarantee myself the ability to always make my mortgage payment on time with money to spare.

Posted by: jasonramsay456 | March 3, 2011 3:49 AM | Report abuse

After what seemed like a lifetime of thirty-Year adjustable-rate mortgages, with monthly mortgage payments going up all the time, The "123 Mortgage Refinance" helped me to lock in a great low fixed rate of 3.16%, helping me to guarantee myself the ability to always make my mortgage payment on time with money to spare.

Posted by: jasonramsay456 | March 3, 2011 3:52 AM | Report abuse

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