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Posted at 6:25 PM ET, 03/10/2011

Unreconciled

By Ezra Klein

Had some meetings run late, so no reconciliation today. But you’re welcome to leave some links. And yes, that last sentence is crowd-sourcing, and it’s the future.

By Ezra Klein  | March 10, 2011; 6:25 PM ET
 
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Next: Wonkbook: Republicans against entitlement reform (at least right now)

Comments

In case you missed it: http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/09/godwins-law-violation/

Posted by: will12 | March 10, 2011 6:43 PM | Report abuse

For Ezra, since he thinks industrial ag is the future:

http://www.grist.org/article/2011-03-10-debunking-myth-that-only-industrial-agriculture-can-feed-world

Posted by: GBMcM | March 10, 2011 6:59 PM | Report abuse

Awesome punk songs with "Punk Rock" in the title:

Dead Milkmen - Punk Rock Girl http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJYjr-vUKZM&feature=related

Atom and His Package - Punk Rock Academy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7zFFmk80w4

Posted by: chrisgaun | March 10, 2011 7:05 PM | Report abuse

Two worthy of some critical commentary:
http://realestateresearch.frbatlanta.org/rer/2011/03/seductive-but-flawed-logic-of-principal-reduction.html
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704758904576188280858303612.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Posted by: jginsbu | March 10, 2011 7:42 PM | Report abuse

Ezra: And yes, that last sentence is crowd-sourcing, and it’s the future.

For some dumb things. Hard to imagine though that the internet (or any of its crowds) would have made Aldous Huxley one ounce smarter. Which leads me to this question: Would you rather read an essay cobbled together by a crowd, or one straight from Huxley's mind?

Which reminds me of a thought from Heinlein's Glory Road:

Wisdom is not additive; its maximum is that of the wisest man in a given group.

Posted by: AgaBey | March 10, 2011 7:48 PM | Report abuse

I don't have any links but I have a question and I wonder if you have any links that help me answer it.

I cannot escape the impression that right now economic behavior is determined first and foremost by one question: Is the economy growing or is it contracting? Obviously the answer depends upon what your job is and where you live. But for most people in the US there are multiple factors that lead people to believe that the economy is shrinking; public and private debt, declining real estate values, high unemployment, rising food and energy costs.

The question is this; How does that perception effect economic behavior? I am beginning to think it has a huge effect that is hard to quantify. If you feel the economy is growing then you are more likely to spend, to take risks like moving to another part of the country or changing jobs or taking classes and changing professions or starting a business. If you have a business you are more likely to hire and expand and make investments in new markets and products.

But aside from the finance sector we are stuck in a psychological conundrum. If we do start to grow then we bump up against environmental or resource depletion issues again. If we continue to stagnate then we have more people fighting for a piece of a shrinking pie. Our politics is becoming even more divisive because there is a growing perception that we are in a zero-sum game. Obama is desperately hoping that the pie grows and we can return to the lift-every-boat psychology of hope and growth.

I have searched for anything concerning the psychology of economic growth vrs the psychology of recession without any luck. suggestions?

Posted by: BobFred | March 10, 2011 7:53 PM | Report abuse

We all need a break from politics once in a while, and music can provide a great distraction. So check out this independant singer on YouTube named Lisa Scinta! She has one of the most angelic voices you'll ever be lucky enough to hear! The natural tone of her voice is unbelievably beautiful. On Facebook, she now has over 30,000 fans, and she even received shout outs from Jason Derulo and Katy Perry, both of whom loved the covers she did of their songs!

This is her singing Eminem's "Love the Way You Lie." Her version sounds even better than the original. It will give you chills:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLsT86nbAVQ&feature=channel_video_title

Posted by: cullenvolvo9 | March 10, 2011 8:05 PM | Report abuse

the seattle times, the largest newspaper in washington state, wants washington's legislature to legalize marijuana for adult use.

you don't talk about the war on drugs much, if ever

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/editorials/2014270472_edit20legal.html

Posted by: jackjudge4000yahoocom | March 10, 2011 8:28 PM | Report abuse

Does this mean I... I... have a job?

Oh, I see. Another place that wants me to donate my labor for free... no thanks.

Posted by: comma1 | March 10, 2011 8:44 PM | Report abuse

I'm sure that everyone continues to pray for Ezra Klein and all those Democrats who are unreconciled. Prayer matters: a leader who fails to pray is likely to fail to prevail in battles of statute, budget, and matters of import.

As Ezra Klein said here today, Republicans are in favor of health care reform and oppose only outrageous payments to union bosses, like Andy Stern, and payments to those who wish to game the system: as Klein noted, Republicans oppose only the failed ideas of Democrats, not health care.

But Michael Moore puts it best when he acknowledges that unions and their legislator Democrats exist to oppose the will of lawfully, democratically elected representatives: Michael Moore and Center for American Progress are working hard to assure that unions -- and not lawfully, democratically-elected representatives -- control all monetary flows. We all should support Michael Moore, Center for American Progress, Chuck Schumer, and President Obama in their overarching government control goals: without the unions favored by Michael Moore and Center for American Progress, democratically elected representatives might enact sensible legislation, might enable growth of small businesses, and might threaten the very fabric of lethargy which connects each Democrat to every other. Why, already "donations" to Center For American Progress Action Fund have suffered -- if we continue to allow lawfully, democratically elected representatives to thrive, the socialist utopia contemplated by Roosevelt and Johnson might never come to be! The time is now -- Michael Moore and Jon Podesta need your support!

Posted by: rmgregory | March 11, 2011 12:09 AM | Report abuse

Ezra,

Please blog about what is taking place in Michigan.

Thanks.

Posted by: Patrick_M | March 11, 2011 12:39 AM | Report abuse

crowd-sourcing==do my work for me

Posted by: tylerstone | March 11, 2011 12:40 AM | Report abuse

RM Gregory seem to be upset that Unions, democratic unions, are able to influence legislators not to simply sell their constituency out to a few wealthy individuals and instead consider the large numbers of state citizens in the union. By the way many of the folks standing shoulder to shoulder with union members are non union and even disgruntled union members. They know a red herring when they see it.

Posted by: tryreason | March 11, 2011 10:53 AM | Report abuse

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