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Sony soups up PlayStation 3 with bigger hard drives

Can we call it the PlayStation 3.5 now? Yet another version of Sony's PlayStation 3 video-game console/Blu-ray player is on the way, bringing more storage and a new wireless controller akin to Nintendo's Wiimote.

The cheaper of Sony's two new models, a version with a 160-gigabyte hard drive and a list price of $299.99 (the same as today's 120 GB model), is headed to stores now. A second, $399.99 configuration ships Sept. 19; it will up storage to 320 GB and include the Move wireless, motion-sensitive controller that Sony unveiled at June's E3 convention, along with the PlayStation Eye camera required by the Move and a few bonus titles.

(You'll also be able to buy the Move controller alone for $49.99 or pay $99.99 for a bundle of that remote and the Eye.)

Sony posted the news on its PlayStation blog Tuesday and then announced it at a trade show this morning in Cologne, Germany.

This is a comparatively minor tweak to the PS3, compared to earlier hardware changes that added WiFi and shrunk the console's dimensions and software updates that, among other things, added support for 3-D HDTV earlier this year. But if you look at the console's original configuration--it debuted in 2006 with 20- and 60-GB drives, selling for $500 and $600--it suggests how far technology has advanced over the past few years.

Anybody want to bet how many more iterations Sony's console has left in it? I look forward to reading your predictions in the comments.

By Rob Pegoraro  |  August 18, 2010; 11:15 AM ET
Categories:  Games  
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Comments

Read this interesting story about how the current economic climate is affecting a PR firm in exurban Chicago. Grim stuff:

http://proposition13.blogspot.com/2010/08/regrets.html

Posted by: HitEleven | August 18, 2010 11:59 AM | Report abuse

Most of us who own a PS3 would not consider bigger hard drives news. The PS3, unlike the XBox 360 comes with an off the shelf 2.5" SATA notebook hard drive, which is user upgradable. I own two PS3 consoles, which originally had 40 and 80GB drives, but now have 250 and 500GB drives. Just buy the cheaper model and take the last $100 and buy a compatible notebook drive. For 100 bucks you can easily buy a drive with a higher capacity than 320GB. Upgrading the drive yourself does not void your warranty.

Posted by: GP04 | August 18, 2010 1:03 PM | Report abuse

They should concentrate on getting better first party games out there instead of releasing a new sku every month...

Posted by: Jfrd7931 | August 18, 2010 3:04 PM | Report abuse

Does anyone know why the PS3 can't be used to provide 3D on ordinary TV's (with fast frame rates)by selling an add-on IR sender and blinker glasses? True, it would compete with 3D ready sets BUT it would bring 3D to the masses.

Posted by: DickK1 | August 18, 2010 6:05 PM | Report abuse

"So how do I use this Wiimote?" lol, a guy said that at last comiccon and he got seriously stink eyed by the playstation guy. I think playstation is taking a cheapshot by using Nintendo's wiimote popularity to introduce their wand. At least xbox was more original by using nothing as interface :P. That's just my opinion.

Posted by: neftaliw | August 18, 2010 6:37 PM | Report abuse

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