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Posted at 10:36 AM ET, 12/27/2010

Kinect hacks that'll make your jaw drop

By Hayley Tsukayama

MSNBC has a roundup of what it thinks of as the best hacks of the Microsoft Kinect motion-gaming device. The list includes the OpenKinect piano, a touch-free way to manipulate medical scans from the Swiss group called Virtopsy, and a gesture-based graphical interface from MIT engineers such as the one featured in the 2002 movie "Minority Report".

Since its Nov. 4 launch, the Kinect has been a darling of hackers everywhere, starting communities such as OpenKinect and KinectHacks, projects dedicated to tapping the full potential of the device's 3-D imaging capabilities.

Those with the know-how are producing everything from ways to make the Kinect play air hockey and air guitar to coming up with a game to help deaf children learn American Sign Language.

When the Wii came out, developers and scientists -- most notably Johnny Chung Lee from Carnegie-Mellon -- used its technology to make low-cost whiteboards and head-tracking devices. The Kinect provides even more opportunities for unexpected applications, since it tracks the human body instead of a controller.

As MSNBC points out, there's been no official word from Microsoft on any of the hacks, and trying any of them yourself could void your warranty.

Check out the videos below to see two of the interesting ideas people have for the Kinect:

By Hayley Tsukayama  | December 27, 2010; 10:36 AM ET
Categories:  Digital culture, Gadgets, Games, Windows  
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Comments

Happy New Year! on a deaf specific dating site Deaftime.com, it requires members to disclose their condition upfront

Posted by: lilliandeaf | December 28, 2010 8:57 AM | Report abuse

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