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Posted at 10:41 AM ET, 12/27/2010

Where's the 2010 we were promised?

By Hayley Tsukayama

2010 is almost over, and while everyone is doing their roundups, over at Wired's GeekDad, they're writing up what sci-fi promised us that the decade didn't bring.

Topping their list? That old perennial gripe, flying cars. Not only do we not have them, but author Jason Cranston Teague points out that flying cars are probably never going to happen from a logistical standpoint. Security issues, he says, will likely keep us grounded for a very, very long time.

Other items on the list include a moon base, anti-aging pills and clean, cheap, unlimited energy.

It will be interesting to see Cranston's next article, about the things sci-fi did get right about the world in 2010. In the meantime, sound off about what you thought would be here by now that isn't.

By Hayley Tsukayama  | December 27, 2010; 10:41 AM ET
 
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Comments

Most music downloads are still in MP3, a format that was designed for home computers with 16MB of memory, 2GB of storage, and dial-up, i.e. the 90s. Hardly anyone provides lossless. Even Apple's iTunes store doesn't offer Apple Lossless (ALAC).

Posted by: beetsnotbeats | December 27, 2010 11:50 AM | Report abuse

There is a good reason that MP3 still dominates. It is appropriate for mobile devices which is where most people do their listening and which still have limited storage space. Just be thankful that DRM and 128kbps are now a rarity and that most downloads are 192kbps or VBR and DRM-free.

The demand for lossless downloads is currently not very high. People either want a physical CD (that BTW won't disappear in a hard drive crash) or they turn their nose up at the 44.1khz/16 bit encoding as inferior to their beloved vinyl. After the implosion of both SACD and DVD-A I don't know when we'll ever get what you want - high fidelity downloads at moderate prices.

Posted by: slar | December 27, 2010 12:24 PM | Report abuse

60 Minutes did a piece earlier in the year about a possible solution to the energy thing.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/08/25/60minutes/main6804405.shtml

Posted by: Cosmo06 | December 27, 2010 12:33 PM | Report abuse

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