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Posted at 9:40 AM ET, 02/ 9/2011

Catholic Church approves confession app

By Hayley Tsukayama

As the Washington Post's On Faith blog reported yesterday, an iPhone app designed to walk users through the sacrament of confession has received an official nod from a Catholic bishop in Indiana.

Confession: A Roman Catholic App, produced by Little iApps, received an imprimatur from Bishop Kevin Rhodes, of the diocese in Fort Wayne, Ind. According to the company's Web site, the app was developed with the Rev. Thomas Weinandy of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, and the Rev. Dan Scheidt, pastor of Queen of Peace Catholic Church in Mishawaka, Ind.

The app is designed to aid confession, not replace it.

Developer Patrick Leinen, in a press release, said that he was inspired to create the program after hearing Pope Benedict XVI's World Communications Address. In that speech, the pope said that he hoped young people would "use modern means of social communication for their personal growth and to better prepare themselves to serve society." The release said that the app already "aided in returning one man to the sacrament after 20 years."

This is thought to be the first iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad app to receive an imprimatur from the church. The app costs $1.99.

Related Stories:

On Faith: Bless me Father, for I have an iPhone

By Hayley Tsukayama  | February 9, 2011; 9:40 AM ET
Categories:  Digital culture  
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Comments

I was taken aback a little by the fact that the app costs money. Then I thought the Church might use it for charity. After seeing it is made by a private company is there any mention of where the proceeds go?

Posted by: jasoncostello42 | February 9, 2011 10:02 AM | Report abuse

Posted by: mikembates | February 9, 2011 1:29 PM | Report abuse

The Catholic Church had nothing to do with the development of this app and doesn't control where the money goes. It was designed and produced by an individual who has the right to benefit from his or her work.

The author of the app asked for the Church to review it to make sure it is in compliance with Church teaching. It is a service that gives confidence to the people who can now use the app with confidence that it is true to the authentic Catholic faith.

An imprimatur from the Church means that the app was reviewed and nothing in it was found to be counter to Church teaching. It does not mean that the app is owned by the Catholic Church. It's a great tool for people who go to Confession and want a disciplined way to do an examination of conscience. It's also great for someone who may have been away from the Sacrament for a while and needs a refresher.

The $1.99 price is reasonable given all that the app delivers.

Posted by: lanthonyprice | February 9, 2011 1:33 PM | Report abuse

Well at least this means the mainstream media have finally acknowledged that the Church, unlike our society, still believes in sin and the need to genuinely repent and seek forgiveness to avoid eternal punishment -as opposed to the "I'm sorry you're offended" apology so acceptable to the sinless political class.

Posted by: DonL1 | February 9, 2011 4:29 PM | Report abuse

Well at least this means the mainstream media have finally acknowledged that the Church, unlike our society, still believes in sin and the need to genuinely repent and seek forgiveness to avoid eternal punishment -as opposed to the "I'm sorry you're offended" apology so acceptable to the sinless political class.

Posted by: DonL1 | February 9, 2011 4:31 PM | Report abuse

"CNN's Kyra Phillips Reports Priests Aren't Necessary for Confession"

Which, if it were true,(it's patently a lie)then all those radical anti-Rome feminist nuns that demand the priesthood, can now relax. Not much fun without hearing those confessions, is there.

Posted by: DonL1 | February 9, 2011 4:42 PM | Report abuse

Staggering. Just STAGGERING to see major news outlets recklessly, carelessly reporting that this app will "replace" confession. Obviously, they have no understanding about the sacrament and DO NOT CARE about it, but don't they at least care about getting their damned information right? How far the press has tumbled.

Posted by: liee | February 9, 2011 4:53 PM | Report abuse

There is a free application for Android devices that is similar called PenanceProject. It helps users do an examination of conscience before the Sacrament and to pray afterwards.

You can get the application here: https://market.android.com/details?id=appinventor.ai_jamorrow.PenanceProject

To find out more about The Penance Project please visit: http://www.thepenanceproject.org

Posted by: jamorrow | February 10, 2011 9:48 AM | Report abuse

Confession is healthy for the soul but not when given to a stranger who may himself be a child moselter. It should be done with someone you know and trust. No one can absolve you that lives on this earth. The precept that the Catholic church has this authority is a farce. The farce is about making money, and now we come to the one and only perpose for a confession app. It is about making money and nothing else. Do not be fooled. Anyone who tells you otherwise has not read and understood the Bible and the great difference between what the Bible says and what the Catholic Church does.

Posted by: callgary2 | February 12, 2011 10:17 AM | Report abuse

After you jailbreak your iPhone, you can use it to ask, "Bless me, Father, for I have SIMmed”...

Posted by: 54Stratocaster | February 15, 2011 5:13 PM | Report abuse

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