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Posted at 9:26 AM ET, 02/17/2011

Sony: We will ban any PS3 hackers

By Hayley Tsukayama

Sony's getting serious in its fight against Playstation 3 hackers, issuing a statement Wednesday that anyone caught with unauthorized or pirated software will be permanently banned from the PlayStation network and from using Qrocity services through the PS3.

On PlayStation.Blog, social media manager Jeff Rubenstein said the company is responding to comments they've heard from customers who are concerned about "incidents that they have been reading about in the gaming press."

That mention of "incidents" undoubtedly refers to Sony's current legal battle with PS3 hacker George Hotz, who released code for the PS3 intended to allow users to put other operating systems on their consoles. Sony says the code encourages piracy, and Hotz was asked to turn over all of his computers to Sony by a California court.

Here's Sony's statement in full, via PlayStation.Blog:

Notice: Unauthorized circumvention devices for the PlayStation 3 system have been recently released by hackers. These devices permit the use of unauthorized or pirated software. Use of such devices or software violates the terms of the "System Software License Agreement for the PlayStation 3 System" and the "Terms of Services and User Agreement" for the PlayStation Network/Qriocity and its Community Code of Conduct provisions. Violation of the System Software License Agreement for the PlayStation 3 System invalidates the consumer guarantee for that system. In addition, copying or playing pirated software is a violation of International Copyright Laws. Consumers using circumvention devices or running unauthorized or pirated software will have access to the PlayStation Network and access to Qriocity services through PlayStation 3 system terminated permanently.
To avoid this, consumers must immediately cease use and remove all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorized or pirated software from their PlayStation 3 systems.

In his post, Rubenstein said that "this message does not apply to the overwhelming majority of our users who enjoy the world of entertainment PlayStation 3 has to offer without breaching the guidelines detailed above, and we urge you to continue doing so without fear."

By Hayley Tsukayama  | February 17, 2011; 9:26 AM ET
Categories:  DRM, Gadgets, Gaming  
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Comments

Let's hope that the "overwhelming majority of users" decides to hack their PS3's too. That would be really cool to see Sony's response to such an "in your face" response to their heavy handed tactics.

If they built real security into their products, they wouldn't have an issue.

Posted by: murrayh | February 17, 2011 10:39 AM | Report abuse

"If they built real security into their products, they wouldn't have an issue."

What does that mean? First of all, it's taken four years for anyone to even come close to hacking the PS3. I'd say that security was pretty real. Sony only seems to be having an issue with the minority of people who claim they want to be able to use their PS3 to it's full capabilities (thinly veiled... as we all know the only reason to hack these consoles is to play pirated PS3 games you can download off the torrent sites). The "overwhelming majority of users" will continue to use their PS3 legally and for what it was intended for.

Posted by: mikeleavitt72 | February 17, 2011 11:01 AM | Report abuse

Playing pirated games is not the only reason. I'd love to be able to run linux on my ps3, as was the case with the original model, mainly so I could use a decent web browser and music player. The PS3 is a real computer (more real than netbooks, anyway), that has been hamstrung.

Posted by: bigjilm | February 17, 2011 11:20 AM | Report abuse

But, did Sony sell you a "real computer" or a gaming console & bluray player? You can browse the web and you can play music. If their software is not up to your standards, then you bought the wrong product. Listen, I've taken a few things off the 'net that I definitely shouldn't have and sure it would be nice to try out a game without having to drop $60 for it, but if I want to play with other people on Sony's network, I have to abide by their rules.

Posted by: mikeleavitt72 | February 17, 2011 12:34 PM | Report abuse

This is ridiculous. He should be able to use whatever software he wants on his PS3 since it is "his" PS3.

If he plays pirated games on his PS3 then he's breaking the law, but it's shouldn't be illegal to use whatever operating system you want.

Posted by: rderr27 | February 17, 2011 1:25 PM | Report abuse

@rderr27... He can use whatever software he wants on his PS3. You can still get Linux and whatever browser/media player is to your liking. You just can't bring that software onto the Sony network.

Posted by: mikeleavitt72 | February 17, 2011 1:35 PM | Report abuse

Sony sells the ps3 as the centerpiece of an entertainment center, not just a game colsole/blu-ray player. For that to be the case, the built-in capabilities need to be less clunky. I should be allowed to run better software, should I so choose, and still retain the ability to access the system's network.

Posted by: bigjilm | February 17, 2011 3:54 PM | Report abuse

There will be always someone to hack their system...It is just a question of time!Let's go doing a petition to let ps3 gamers alone!Let's go rebel...


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http://twitter.com/battlecrafts

Posted by: Battlecrafts | February 17, 2011 4:00 PM | Report abuse

There will be always someone to hack their system...It is just a question of time!Let's go doing a petition to let ps3 gamers alone!Let's go rebel...


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http://twitter.com/battlecrafts

Posted by: Battlecrafts | February 17, 2011 4:07 PM | Report abuse

Ok... Let me just tell you how I feel about this. Sony can ban ban whoever when ever they want. Why? It is Sony's System... Sony's Network, and Sony's Creation. It is in their possession. So, with that in mind, all of the hackers say "Well its mine so I can do what I want with it!" Exactly... It is yours... But the network belongs to Sony so if they want to ban you, they can. Its not like they are banning you from turning on your PS3.

On the other hand, I feel the ruling with Geo Hotz is bull crap. Ok Sony... We understand you are highly upset that your sacred PS3 firmware got hacked. Here is an idea. May you should put your big boy panties on and start putting more money towards the security of the ps3 and not towards lawyers to sue the ones who jailbreak it. Also, I do NOT in ANYWAY feel that posting the code is breaking copyright laws. He is in NO way making money off of this. Which is really the idea of copyrighting something. So someone else does not profit from your idea. And taking all of his computers just for posting a source code from the PS3 that HE PAID FOR!?!?! Are you kidding me? We can jailbreak our iPhones and Root our androids but the second you touch a PS3, call the DCMA!!! They might have something to say about it!!! Grow up Sony. You are just ticked off that the PS3 is hacked and the code it out.

Posted by: xKITBx | February 17, 2011 4:45 PM | Report abuse

"But, did Sony sell you a "real computer" or a gaming console & bluray player?"

Hmm their advertisement says it does everything.

Maybe they should tone it down to what it is actually capable of doing, or what they will currently allow it to do.

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"But the network belongs to Sony so if they want to ban you, they can. Its not like they are banning you from turning on your PS3."

But it does go much deeper then that... they will make future games and blue ray disks require a firmware update before they will work on your hacked console. Note these are purchased items not something downloaded or pirated. This effectively forces you back into OFW if you want to play newer titles, even if you are not pirating and don't want to use PSN.

Posted by: james_26685 | February 23, 2011 1:26 PM | Report abuse

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