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Federal employees warned about March Madness

By Ed O'Keefe

By The Post's Dan Steinberg in his D.C. Sports Bog:

A federal employee attempted to enter The Post's bracket challenge at the workplace and was denied. The employee sent along this e-mail from the employee's agency, sent out last Friday. It provides high comedy.

Gambling in the Federal Workplace

College basketball teams are now playing in their respective league championship tournaments and soon the "NCAA March Madness" brackets will be announced. Many sports fans are accustomed to placing a friendly wager on a favorite team. While betting a few dollars on sports is often viewed as a harmless social pastime, if done at work it runs afoul of the Federal regulations that prohibit gambling for money or property in the Federal workplace. Predicting teams that will advance in a college basketball bracket purely for fun or picking winners to claim bragging rights in the office are not the types of conduct that generally raise concerns.

Federal rules on gambling are found at sections 735.201 of title 5 and 102-74.395 of title 41 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Specifically, these sections prohibit employees from gambling while on duty, or while on government-owned or leased property, unless necessitated by their official duties. These restrictions apply not only to Federal employees, but also to members of the public at large, contractors, vendors, and exhibitors when on GSA-controlled property.

Continue reading at the D.C. Sports Bog >>>

By Ed O'Keefe  | March 15, 2010; 1:57 PM ET
Categories:  Workplace Issues  
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Comments

Good luck with that.

Posted by: corrections | March 16, 2010 11:55 AM | Report abuse

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