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Federal judge's impeachment trial ends

By Ed O'Keefe

The Senate impeachment trial of a federal judge is over, but he'll have to wait until after the midterm elections to learn his fate.

Thomas Porteous
U.S. District Court Judge of Louisiana G. Thomas Porteous Jr. on Sept. 16 at his Senate impeachment trial. (Melina Mara/Post)

Judge G. Thomas Porteous Jr. of New Orleans was impeached by the House in March and a committee of 12 senators spent most of the last 10 days hearing 30 hours of testimony from 27 witnesses regarding the four articles of impeachment.

The proceedings included tales of a Las Vegas bachelor party, buckets of shrimp and other highlights of the often-sordid state of Louisiana politics. (Colleague Ann Gerhart brilliantly captured the scene last week.)

The Senate Impeachment Trial Committee, chaired by Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), plans to submit a full report on the proceedings to the full Senate by mid-November. Aides stress that the report will not recommend how the full Senate should vote, but will instead summarize the testimony and evidence for each senator to review.

Once the Senate is ready to debate and vote on the case, Porteous's lawyers and members of the House of Representatives will make their closing arguments on the Senate floor. A conviction on just one of the articles is enough to remove Porteous from office.

Leave your thoughts in the comments section below

By Ed O'Keefe  | September 23, 2010; 11:00 AM ET
Categories:  Congress, Oversight  
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Comments

"Judge Thomas Porteous and the 'Devil's Den" from Whence He Came"
http://newsblaze.com/story/20100922041842lawg.nb/topstory.html


"There is massive, inherent legal corruption in the judicial system, taking place in Louisiana, in what I call the "Devil's Den."

". . .even after exposure of irrefutable facts and truths at Porteous' impeachment trial, scandalous behavior will continue because Porteous is not the only problem --just the most conspicuous culprit. . ."

". . .the courts of Louisiana serve the purpose of unfair enrichment, at the disadvantage of some people; and for certain politically-connected people, the courts serve as an avenue to 'the good life'. Additionally, anyone who hinders Louisiana 'good life' pursuits becomes subjected to the vilest treatment by jurists who disguise themselves as upholders and enforcers of laws." *read entire article @ http://newsblaze.com/story/20100922041842lawg.nb/topstory.html

Posted by: lawgrace | September 23, 2010 11:27 AM | Report abuse

I'm from Louisiana, my family is in politics. I claim to be kinda honest, that's why I fled.

Truth is, having lived elsewhere, my experience is there's not much difference between corruption in Louisiana and elsewhere.

It's just, Louisiana DOES have a way of doing it with panache, a flair, not seen elsewhere. As in, the Judge filing for bankruptcy using a fake name. And, there's nothing in the Code of Judicial Conduct about taking buckets of fresh shrimp from a friend.

As in, we know multiple members of Congress have taken bribes. Few have been caught with $100,000 in their freezer, ala Dollar Bill Jefferson.

Give the Judge 10 points. What he did wasn't unusual for New Orleans. He didn't steal a LOT. I'd say he's well within the standard of conduct for Louisiana.

Remember, this is a state where Edwin Edwards, who the Judge was involved with, got re-elected with a media campaign VOTE FOR THE CROOK. Ed's now in a Federal Pen, there was some misunderstanding over money he took. These things DO happen.

'Sides. The Judge came incredibly close to being on the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, one just below the US Supremes.

Posted by: burlough | September 23, 2010 2:03 PM | Report abuse

.the courts of Louisiana serve the purpose of unfair enrichment, at the disadvantage of some people; and for certain politically-connected people, the courts serve as an avenue to 'the good life'. Additionally, anyone who hinders Louisiana 'good life' pursuits becomes subjected to the vilest treatment by jurists who disguise themselves as upholders and enforcers of laws.
-----------
And if you actually think it doesn't happen just about everywhere, then you've not been in nearly as many courtrooms as I have.

Posted by: burlough | September 23, 2010 2:21 PM | Report abuse

burlough,

My years of drum beating about deplorable conditions in the courts is definitely NOT for purposes of comparison. Change needs to come. The goal of my describing situations is to clearly assert issues to become targeted in hopes of reform.

If, as you say, such things exists where you are, I hope that you have begun attempting to "make a difference." I hope that you are attempting or considering being part of the SOLUTION (not the PROBLEM).

Posted by: lawgrace | September 24, 2010 2:06 PM | Report abuse

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