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Posted at 12:08 PM ET, 01/27/2011

Military to accelerate training for end of 'don't ask'

By Craig Whitlock

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said he was "confident" the military will meet all requirements to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" law this year, adding that the Pentagon will accelerate training programs to pave the way for gays and lesbians to serve openly.

"We're shooting to get it done sooner rather than later," Gates told reporters from The Washington Post, the Associated Press and the New York Times in a joint interview Wednesday evening as he flew to Ottawa to meet with Canadian defense officials.

In his State of the Union speech Tuesday night, President Obama vowed sometime this year to stop enforcing the 17-year-old law that forces gay troops to stay in the closet or risk expulsion. "Starting this year, no American will be forbidden from serving the country they love because of who they love," Obama said, without giving details.

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By Craig Whitlock  | January 27, 2011; 12:08 PM ET
Categories:  Military  
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