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Posted at 7:00 AM ET, 02/ 2/2011

Know a fed eligible for insurance or an award?

By Ed O'Keefe

Eye Opener

Interested in joining the government's Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program? Eligible workers, retirees and their spouses or same-sex partners may apply for coverage during a special open season from April 4 to May 27, according to the Office of Personnel Management.

Current and former civilian federal employees, postal workers who are eligible for the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, and certain uniformed members of the military may join the program. The District's government and court workers are also eligible.

Coverage would begin the first day of the month after an application is approved.

Though eligible folks may join the program at any time, this is the first open season in years. Those interested may call 1-800-582-3337 or visit http://www.ltcfeds.com.

Nomination period for Service to America Medals extended: You have until next Monday to nominate an award-worthy federal worker. The Partnership for Public Service has extended the nomination period and added a new category for Management Excellence. Nominate your favorite fed at http://www.servicetoamericamedals.org.

Cabinet and Staff News: A profile Frank Wisner, America's (temporary) man in Cairo. President Obama meets today with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton today, and she too is key to his success in Egypt. Inside Michelle Obama's closet.

ATF:
ATF gunrunning probe strategy scrutinized after death of Border Patrol agent: Two AK-47 assault rifles purchased by a man later arrested in a federal gunrunning investigation turned up at the scene of a fatal shooting of a Border Patrol agent in December, according to sources familiar with the investigation.

DEFENSE DEPARTMENT:
Mental health specialist recommended WikiLeaks suspect not be deployed to Iraq: The recommendation by the specialist at Fort Drum, N.Y., did not disqualify Pfc. Bradley E. Manning from being sent to Iraq. The final decision on whether a soldier is fit to go to a war zone rests with his immediate commanders.

FDA:
FDA finds Salmonella during egg-farm inspections: The agency is inspecting the country's 600 largest egg farms in the wake of a salmonella outbreak in eggs last summer that sickened at least 1,900 people.

FEMA:
FEMA mobilized as winter storms hit U.S.: The federal government is sending workers and equipment to at least 11 states as a winter storm bears down on a wide swath of the country.

GSA:
GSA updates construction standards to promote energy efficiency: The standards call for a 30 percent reduction in energy use over a 2003 baseline and 20 percent reduction in water use over the baseline for a similarly sized building that met 1992 Environmental Protection Agency water requirements.

IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT:
Number of illegal immigrants holding steady at 11 million: A two-year decline in the number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. during the recession has halted.

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT:
Interior Dept. issues new policy protecting government scientists: The new scientific integrity policy applies to the department's 67,000 employees as well as its contractors, grant recipients and volunteers.

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT:
'JihadJane' pleads guilty in terror plot: In doing so, Colleen LaRose admitted to federal prosecutors' accusations that she "worked obsessively on her computer" to recruit people to wage violent jihad in Europe and South Asia.

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION:
Panda pregnancy watch begins at the Zoo: The zoo is focusing intense effort this year and next year on trying to achieve a pregnancy with its giant pandas, and may be able to request new pandas from the China.

Smithsonian nominates Steve Case for its board: His nomination requires approval by the Congress and White House.

STATE DEPARTMENT:
Top diplomat defends size, cost of State Dept. presence in Iraq: James F. Jeffrey, the U.S. ambassador in Iraq, told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that his staff of 8,000 will grow in the coming year to about 17,000 people, the vast majority of whom will be contractors.

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By Ed O'Keefe  | February 2, 2011; 7:00 AM ET
Categories:  Workplace Issues  
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Next: Government waste in focus

Comments

Most group long-term care policies do not offer any type of discount to married couples or domestic partners.

Married couples (or those who have been domestic partners for 2 years or more) can usually get at least a 30% discount off of both of their long-term care policies when they purchase a policy on their own rather than through their employer.

Here’s a link with a more detailed explanation:

http://bit.ly/GroupLTCi-vs-Individual

Posted by: ScottAOlsonLTC | February 2, 2011 11:14 AM | Report abuse

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