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Get There: October 14, 2007 - October 20, 2007

Traffic and Transit Advisories

The center of attention for travelers this weekend -- or the place to avoid -- is in downtown Washington. Downtown Street Closings The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are holding annual meetings this weekend. Here's how that will affect drivers and pedestrians. Beginning at 8 p.m. Friday until 2 a.m. Sunday, these streets will be closed: -- Pennsylvania Avenue, NW between 17th Street and 20th Street NW -- 19th Street, NW between I ("Eye") Street and F Street NW -- H Street NW between 17th Street and 20th Street NW From 8 p.m. on Friday to 9 p.m. Monday, these streets will be closed: -- 18th Street NW between F Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW -- 19th Street NW between F Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW -- 20th Street NW between F Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW -- F Street NW between 17th Street and 20th Street NW Vehicular...

By Robert Thomson  |  October 19, 2007; 11:28 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Advisories  
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Douglass Bridge Work Continues

Just below where your tires roll across the Frederick Douglass Bridge, workers continue to fix or replace parts of the structure. Along South Capitol Street, where construction of the new Nationals stadium continues to make dramatic progress, other crews are at work on the roadway and sidewalks. Riveter works on girder below bridge deck. (Robert Thomson) But the District is done with lane closures, and the remaining work is pretty much something to entertain commuters rather than annoy them. What they'll see on the bridge includes the continuing replacement of the old railings with a darker, more attractive design that resembles the one used on Pennsylvania Avenue's Sousa Bridge. Out of sight below the deck, in a big box-like area of pale gray steel, workers are riveting new bolts into place while either refurbishing or replacing aging parts of the structure across the Anacostia River. Aside from making the whole...

By Robert Thomson  |  October 19, 2007; 7:59 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Construction  
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Route 28 Interchange Underway

Work starts today on an important bit of congestion relief in Virginia: Construction of an interchange to replace the intersection of Route 28 and Frying Pan Road near Dulles Airport in Fairfax County. This is the last of 10 interchanges to be built along Route 28, a major north south commuter route with links that include Route 7, the Dulles Toll Road and Interstate 66. Seven of the 10 new interchanges are done. Along with Frying Pan Road, the other two remaining to be completed are at Nokes Boulevard and Willard Road. The latter two got underway this summer. All three are scheduled to be done in fall 2009, and not a moment too soon, according to commuters. On Tuesday, I checked out the recently opened partial interchange at Innovation Avenue. It's partial because the ramps link only with the northbound lanes of Route 28. There's not enough demand yet...

By Robert Thomson  |  October 17, 2007; 12:56 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Construction  
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What's Your Favorite Drive?

Steven Ginsberg, The Post's transportation editor and the mastermind of our Sunday commuter page, is looking for your ideas on a commuter page project. Here's a note from Steven: "Doesn't it seem like the view on Washington area roads is almost always the same: the bumper on the car in front of you? Maybe you get a glimpse of the occasional sound wall. "Believe it or not, there actually are quite a few fairly scenic drives in the Washington region. The George Washington Parkway pops to mind. Parts of Route 15 are gorgeous. "Now that the leaves are starting to fall and you may actually want to take a leisurely Sunday drive, we're compiling a list of favorite area roads or stretches of roads. Send your thoughts and ideas to commuter@washpost.com." I can add that both Maryland and Virginia are very proud of their scenic drives. Virginia has a list...

By Robert Thomson  |  October 17, 2007; 5:27 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Driving  
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Foxhall Closing for Road Work

The District plans to close most of Foxhall Road to through traffic after morning rush on Wednesday, and it will remain shut through Oct. 25 if the construction work goes according to plan. Residents and visitors will still have access to the area, which is between Reservoir Road and Nebraska Avenue in Northwest Washington. But the many commuters who use this route will have to follow detour signs or find alternatives. This work is part of a $4 million road construction and streetscape project on Foxhall between Nebraska Avenue and Canal Road. The overall project, scheduled to be completed by next June, will widen the intersection at Reservoir Road, adding a left turn lane from eastbound Reservoir to northbound Foxhall; fix the sidewalks, pavement markings and traffic signs; add signals and street lighting at Reservoir and Foxhall; and resurface the roadway between Canal and Nebraska. Here are the detours for...

By Robert Thomson  |  October 16, 2007; 7:35 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (23)
Categories:  Construction  
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Metro Communications and More

Metro riders will be interested in today's story by Lena H. Sun and Jonathan Mummolo about the transit authority's plan to provide more information and coordination during service disruptions. Here's the key paragraph, the statement I think will ring true to many riders: "The communication problems trace to nearly every aspect of how Metro operates. Some are technical and require more money and new procedures; others could be fixed with little more than handing out dry-erase boards. The most basic could be fixed with dedication to old-fashioned customer service." On Metro's side: It's a big, complex system and things are bound to go wrong. Because things go right most of the time, hundreds of thousands of people rely on the transit system to get to and from work each day. On the other hand: When something goes wrong, nobody seems to know anything for at least the first 20 minutes....

By Robert Thomson  |  October 15, 2007; 7:48 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (8)
Categories:  Commuting  
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