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Posted at 9:25 AM ET, 02/18/2011

New movies: 'Unknown,' 'I Am Number Four,' 'The Last Lions'

By Jess Righthand


"Unknown" reestablishes Liam Neeson in the role of middle-aged action star. (Warner Bros. Pictures)

In this week's new movie releases, a deceased bride comes back to life, a lone lioness endures in the jungle, and Liam Neeson stars in a sophisticated follow-up to the 2008 surprise hit, "Taken." Here's what Post critics had to say:

"Unknown" (PG-13) "A film that trades the lurid extremes of 'Taken' for a more subtle, sophisticated vibe... As long as filmgoers come to 'Unknown' unencumbered by a need for plausibility, this handsome, well-paced production posesses its share of twisty, visceral pleasures." -- Ann Hornaday

"The Last Lions" (Unrated) "The National Geographic film manages to add the punch of a war movie and the emotion of a family drama to this chronicle of a lioness's life. The result is a movie that may be geared to a nature film fan base but will also appeal to admirers of good storytelling." -- Stephanie Merry

"I Am Number Four" (PG-13) "Sorry 'I Am Number Four,' but I Am Not Impressed. Unoriginal and woefully half-baked." -- Sean O'Connell

"The Strange Case of Angelica" (Unrated) "This lovely but overly leisurely ode to romance and imagination is also a playful tribute to the supernatural films made many decades before the advent of CGI...The movie does drag in places, but every frame justifies itself in sheer beauty." -- Mark Jenkins

"When We Leave" (Unrated) "As much a European art film as a political melodrama, 'When We Leave' isn't one of those movies where people are always explaining how they feel. But when they do reveal themselves, the words sting." -- Mark Jenkins

"Twelve Thirty" (Unrated) "With so many marriages ending in divorce these days, making a heartfelt movie about the carnage wrought by a broken family seems like an easy feat. And yet, for all the promising fodder, the talky, acrid 'Twelve Thirty' feels soulless, an emotion-free zone that deals its darkness in a shockingly flip manner." -- Stephanie Merry

By Jess Righthand  | February 18, 2011; 9:25 AM ET
Categories:  Movies  
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