Oh My

Hate to seem like I'm picking on defense contractors and the hardworking DoD acquisition workforce. But people. Please. What is going on here?

Officials from the Government Accountability Office, in testimony before House lawmakers released yesterday, said cost overruns and missed deadlines are getting worse.

The GAO review found that average delays in delivery were 16 months. Last year, the average delay was 21 months.The estimated total acquisition cost growth rose from $42 billion to $295 billion.

I know we've heard all this before. But.

"Every dollar spent inefficiently in acquiring weapon systems is less money available for other budget priorities--such as the global war on terror and growing entitlement programs," the GAO reported.

That's right, and on schools and roads and bridges and, well, a lot of other things the government might want to spend money on. Right?

By Robert O'Harrow |  April 30, 2008; 4:01 PM ET defense
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so what! this is just a red herring. we've voted over and over again for policy makers that will enhance the affordability of our million dollar arlington houses and bmw acquisitions. thank god the american public, which has it high incomes to thank for our high government spending, goes along!!! indeed, we want more. there is no reason to waste money on those that don't cut the mustard like we, the beautiful, do in metro dc.

Posted by: wes | May 1, 2008 5:31 AM

The answer to this little problem is really quite simple,in my opinion.
Require the contractors to submit a bid for the projects in question more closely to the actual amount needed for the job. That would require that the contractors to do their homework better in order to win the bid.They should know the costs of materials as well as the cost's of labor, prior to submitting their bid's.If the cost's over run is a lot more than the projected bid than require the contractors to pay the over run out of their pocketbook.That way they would think twice about overestimating or underestimating the cost's of the projects.

Posted by: Mike | May 5, 2008 11:15 AM

The answer to this little problem is really quite simple,in my opinion.
Require the contractors to submit a bid for the projects in question more closely to the actual amount needed for the job. That would require that the contractors to do their homework better in order to win the bid.They should know the costs of materials as well as the cost's of labor, prior to submitting their bid's.If the cost's over run is a lot more than the projected bid than require the contractors to pay the over run out of their pocketbook.That way they would think twice about overestimating or underestimating the cost's of the projects.

Posted by: Mike | May 5, 2008 11:20 AM

I'm not going to micromanage this mess, that's for sure. Things will turn around in a few months. Organization is coming, so to speak.

Posted by: Leslie Sutton | May 10, 2008 6:45 PM

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