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Hard Hits Live: Keys to Sunday's Redskins-Texans game

LaVar talked about the key matchups in this Sunday's Redskins-Texans games in this week's Hard Hits Live webcast. Join him every Friday at 10:30 a.m., Eastern, for Hard Hits LIve. Submit your questions beforehand. Also, check out the weekly Redskins Insider Live show, every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.

By Washington Post Sports  | September 17, 2010; 12:29 PM ET
 
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Next: Texans 30, Redskins 27: The checklist

Comments

I'm a lifelong subscriber to the Washington Post. This is my first time posting on this site, and it is for a simple reason, Lavar Arrington. I can't possibly express what a breath of fresh air it is to have a blog on the website of the Post devoted to actual FOOTBALL. I was never a huge fan of Arrington's as a player, but his insight, analysis and writings have brought me back to this site.

Suffice it to say, the tabloid story lines that seem to be the perpetual pursuit of Jason Reid and Redskins Insider have grown stale, and frequently repel this particular reader. Reid's apparent lack of knowledge of the game, combined with his clear ambition to have an impact on the team and desire to define the news, has pushed the tone and substance of Post coverage towards manufactured scandal and bottom feeding. I'm all for criticism of the team, but Reid's absurd coverage is the antithesis of the type of journalism the Post has always championed. Let's just say, I can't imagine Jason Reid working for a minute at Ben Bradlee's Washington Post.

Football at the professional level is a game of remarkable complexity--it's chess with an almost infinite number of variables and risks from play-to-play: talent, players, speeds, skills, schemes, plays, tendencies of the opposition, constantly changing metrics (1st down, 3rd down), three dimensional space, weather, hundreds of different formations and audibles from team to team, injuries, you name it. And while in football, as in life, some just luck into some fleeting amount of success, the coaches and analysts that have lasting impact are simply the smarter ones, the students of the game.

I'm hopeful that the sports editors at the Post take the success of Lavar's blog as evidence that its readership is hungry for smart analysis of the team and the sport, and pivots Redskins coverage accordingly.

Furthermore, since all Jason Reid seems to do in "Redskins Insider" is take every line uttered by Coach Shanahan in his daily press conference and pump them up into a "story.", given the Post's financial struggles of late, I recommend you replace Reid's coverage with a transcript or direct video of Shanahan's daily briefing. You'll save money and the readership will be just as informed.

Posted by: restless | September 18, 2010 3:01 AM | Report abuse

I'm a lifelong subscriber to the Washington Post. This is my first time posting on this site, and it is for a simple reason, Lavar Arrington. I can't possibly express what a breath of fresh air it is to have a blog on the website of the Post devoted to actual FOOTBALL. I was never a huge fan of Arrington's as a player, but his insight, analysis and writings have brought me back to this site.

Suffice it to say, the tabloid story lines that seem to be the perpetual pursuit of Jason Reid and Redskins Insider have grown stale, and frequently repel this particular reader. Reid's apparent lack of knowledge of the game, combined with his clear ambition to have an impact on the team and desire to define the news, has pushed the tone and substance of Post coverage towards manufactured scandal and bottom feeding. I'm all for criticism of the team, but Reid's absurd coverage is the antithesis of the type of journalism the Post has always championed. Let's just say, I can't imagine Jason Reid working for a minute at Ben Bradlee's Washington Post.

Football at the professional level is a game of remarkable complexity--it's chess with an almost infinite number of variables and risks from play-to-play: talent, players, speeds, skills, schemes, plays, tendencies of the opposition, constantly changing metrics (1st down, 3rd down), three dimensional space, weather, hundreds of different formations and audibles from team to team, injuries, you name it. And while in football, as in life, some just luck into some fleeting amount of success, the coaches and analysts that have lasting impact are simply the smarter ones, the students of the game.

I'm hopeful that the sports editors at the Post take the success of Lavar's blog as evidence that its readership is hungry for smart analysis of the team and the sport, and pivots Redskins coverage accordingly.

Furthermore, since all Jason Reid seems to do in "Redskins Insider" is take every line uttered by Coach Shanahan in his daily press conference and pump them up into a "story," given the Post's financial struggles of late, I recommend you replace Reid's coverage with a transcript or direct video of Shanahan's daily briefing. You'll save money and the readership will be just as informed.

Posted by: restless | September 18, 2010 3:07 AM | Report abuse

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