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How Delaney found his stroke

After Malcolm Delaney had scored 31 points in Virginia Tech's 74-62 win over Georgia on Sunday, he spoke about spending some extra time in the gym to find his shot.

While Virginia Tech played on the road in each of its last four games, Delaney said he was unable to work on a shooting touch that started to feel uncomfortable. Delaney shot 35.9 percent in those games; he averaged 41.1 in ACC play last season.

"I was off-balance" Delaney said. "Usually, if I’m feeling something in my shot, I can tell when I’m not shooting normal."

On Sunday, Delaney's third 30-point game of his career came on 10-of-19 shooting from the field. Also, he hit 2 of 7 three-point attempts. The difference was in his preparation.

With Virginia Tech back in Blacksburg, Delaney was able to put in the extra time. He arrived early to each practice last week, studied a DVD of every shot he has taken this season to find his flaws and worked with one-on-one with Coach Seth Greenberg for 20 minutes on Saturday.

While working out with Greenberg, Delaney focused on maintaining his balance when shooting off screens. Greenberg put a chair on the court Saturday to simulate a screen and had Delaney cut around it. They key, Greenberg said, was to make sure Delaney caught passes low after cutting, which allowed him to maintain a low center of gravity for better balance.

"In the game, I'm coming off a lot of screens now," Delaney said. "So it's a big difference from just working on set shots and coming off screens, because you're going full-speed and you're trying to shoot. I wasn't used to it."

By Mark Viera  |  December 8, 2009; 1:25 PM ET
 
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