Network News

X My Profile
View More Activity
On Twitter: HokiesJournal and PostSports  |  Facebook  |  E-mail alerts: Redskins and Sports  |  RSS
Posted at 2:10 PM ET, 12/10/2010

Foster turned down an interview for the Vanderbilt job

By Mark Giannotto

While many of Virginia Tech's football players were at Cassell Coliseum last Sunday soaking in a standing ovation following their ACC championship game victory the night before, Coach Frank Beamer and defensive coordinator Bud Foster were en route to the Tidewater area, making a final push for a recruit -- rumored to be four-star Kempsville High linebacker Travis Hughes, who is also considering Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina among others.

Little did anyone know, though, Foster's decision to board that plane likely cost him a chance at becoming the head coach at Vanderbilt. During a scheduled news conference with reporters Friday, Foster revealed that he was approached by the search committee charged with hiring Vanderbilt's next head coach.

That left Foster with a dilemma: try to secure another recruit for Virginia Tech or potentially go to Nashville for an interview. It seems, yet again, Foster chose the Hokies.

“It wasn’t much of a thought process, to be honest with you," Foster said. "I was a candidate and there’s no guarantees with that. Obviously these kids that we went to go see were priorities for us and can keep our football program going in the direction that we want it to go and would be impact players in our program. And I told that to the search committee people and they understood that.

"I talked to them after that and I gave them a date that I thought would be a good time for me if they wanted to continue on with me. I haven’t heard back from them, so they might have taken that as maybe I wasn’t interested."

The Post's Eric Prisbell reports that Vanderbilt is down to three finalists in its search for a new head coach. According to multiple sources, they are Auburn offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn, Maryland offensive coordinator James Franklin and Stanford offensive coordinator Greg Roman.

This isn't the first time, and almost certainly won't be the last time, Foster's name comes up in the head coaching rumor mill. Foster said Friday, though, that he hasn't been contacted about any other heading coaching jobs since the season ended.

He also offered some comforting words that should soothe some worries over whether or not Foster would leave Blacksburg for just any opening.

"That’s an SEC job, but I might have a better job here as defensive coordinator at Virginia Tech than I would as the head coach at Vanderbilt," Foster said. "And I say that, you guys know my personality, I don’t know how I would do with the best you can do is win five or six games if you play your best football. I know here we’ve got an opportunity to win every time we step on the field. With that being said, if the opportunity comes up, we’ll see where it goes but there may not be another opportunity.”

By Mark Giannotto  | December 10, 2010; 2:10 PM ET
 
Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati   Google Buzz   Previous: CB Jayron Hosley named a Walter Camp all-American
Next: Ryan Williams, Darren Evans discuss the NFL draft process

Comments

So the question I have is should have the head coach told his assistant to interview for the Vandy job while Frank Beamer completed the recruiting trip. Bud Foster may be totally at peace with remaining a respected and loyal assistant but if he really wants to be a head coach..carpe diem.

Posted by: generalike | December 10, 2010 5:17 PM | Report abuse

Read between the lines in what Foster is saying. Why should he go from a great position (24 years in a great job, with great pay, a great boss, with a great future) to a "coach killer" position? What is the likelihood that anyone can be successful in a division with South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Tennessee division and having to work through the high academic standards required at Vandy? He isn't like Franklin who is dying to get out of Maryland. Foster will leave one day, but it will be for the right situation for him.

Posted by: gbrown4 | December 10, 2010 10:20 PM | Report abuse

Read between the lines in what Foster is saying. Why should he go from a great position (24 years in a great job, with great pay, a great boss, with a great future) to a "coach killer" position? What is the likelihood that anyone can be successful in a division with South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Tennessee division and having to work through the high academic standards required at Vandy? He isn't like Franklin who is dying to get out of Maryland. Foster will leave one day, but it will be for the right situation for him.

Posted by: gbrown4 | December 10, 2010 10:21 PM | Report abuse

You know what, not every great coordinator is cut out to be a head coach. It's possible that Foster knows himself and his strengths/weaknesses and has made a decision to remain a coordinator. Can't fault him for that.

Posted by: kemp13 | December 11, 2010 12:36 AM | Report abuse

Seems like if he had been their favorite candidate, they'd have let him reschedule. Likewise, if he'd been interested in Vandy, he'd have tried to work his schedule a little harder.

Maybe it just wasn't the right fit all around.

I know he does a GREAT job at Virginia Tech, and I'd hate to see him leave that program -- particularly since he still has some rebuilding to do.

Posted by: Benson | December 11, 2010 8:46 AM | Report abuse

Post a Comment

We encourage users to analyze, comment on and even challenge washingtonpost.com's articles, blogs, reviews and multimedia features.

User reviews and comments that include profanity or personal attacks or other inappropriate comments or material will be removed from the site. Additionally, entries that are unsigned or contain "signatures" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. Finally, we will take steps to block users who violate any of our posting standards, terms of use or privacy policies or any other policies governing this site. Please review the full rules governing commentaries and discussions.




characters remaining

 
 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company