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A House Divided: December 19, 2010 - December 25, 2010

Tweeting the War: South Carolina secedes

The Washington Post is tweeting the events leading to the secession of South Carolina 150 years ago, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day, particularly The Washington...

By Mary Hadar  | December 24, 2010; 3:02 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (2)
Categories:  News, Tweeting the war  | Tags:  Tweeting the war  
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DNA may answer question of Booth's escape

For decades the story has circulated that President Lincoln’s assassin John Wilkes Booth escaped capture and lived for many more years under an assumed name. No one was able to prove it either way and so the story has had...

By Linda Wheeler  | December 24, 2010; 12:33 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
Categories:  News  | Tags:  john wilkes booth  
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Diverse gift suggestions from Civil War sites

Just about every gift shop associated with a Civil War site has books, T-shirts, mugs, calendars and throws but there are a few with some unusual items. President Lincoln’s Cottage offers the President Lincoln Bobblehead for $16.95 and a golf...

By Linda Wheeler  | December 22, 2010; 12:08 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  News  
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Frank Williams: Did the national government or individual states own the federal forts in the South?

There is little question that they and other coastal fortifications like Pulaski in Savannah were Federal property...

By Frank Williams  | December 20, 2010; 10:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (2)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Frank Williams  
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Harold Holzer: Did the national government or individual states own the federal forts in the South?

The federal government’s ownership of those outposts was as certain as the unbreakable compact that made secession likewise impossible; to concede one would be to concede the other. If secession was illegal, then the forts, arsenals, and post offices belonged eternally to the government that created them and maintained them for the good of all people...

By Harold Holzer  | December 20, 2010; 10:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Harold Holzer  
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Scott Hartwig: Did the national government or individual states own the federal forts in the South?

The national government did. The forts and the arsenals were built and existed for the common defense, not solely for the defense of state property or at the expense of the individual state in which they existed. And so war would decide who owned the federal forts...

By Scott Hartwig  | December 20, 2010; 10:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (3)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Scott Hartwig  
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Kate Masur: Did the national government or the individual states own the federal forts in the South?

South Carolinians' bid to control the forts was an extension of the same impulse to banish the federal government...

By Kate Masur  | December 20, 2010; 10:00 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Kate Masur  
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