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A House Divided: January 9, 2011 - January 15, 2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Mississippi, Florida and Alabama secede from the Union

Updated: 1/19/2011 The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. Follow us. Twitter recap from week one: Showdown in Charleston...

By Mary Hadar  | January 14, 2011; 4:11 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Tweeting the war  
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Lee-Jackson Day in Virginia, Maryland

Cold weather has yet to deter enthusiastic participation in two ceremonies in recognition of the birthdays of Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, one in Lexington, Va. and the other in Baltimore. They are scheduled for Saturday and...

By Linda Wheeler  | January 13, 2011; 10:52 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (4)
Categories:  Events, News, Re-enactments  | Tags:  lee-jackson day  
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New name, new logo for CWPT

The Civil War Preservation Trust, usually known as CWPT, on Monday night announced a new, shorter name and much changed logo. Surveys at battlefields had indicated the general public had no idea what the organization was or what it did....

By Linda Wheeler  | January 11, 2011; 1:40 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  News  | Tags:  civil war preservation trust  
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Chandra Manning: Why was Abraham Lincoln so silent following his election?

Lincoln maintained that statements from him were pointless because his positions were available in the public record; while such a response is not notable for its graciousness, there was some truth in it ...

By Chandra Manning  | January 10, 2011; 9:56 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Chandra Manning  
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Frank Williams: Why was Abraham Lincoln so silent following his election?

One must ask what silence means. If it means not making any public statements or attempting to perform acts then this describes Lincoln's reticence - all due in no small measure to the fact that he was not yet President and would not be until March 4, 1861. The country still had a sitting, albeit, ineffectual chief magistrate...

By Frank Williams  | January 10, 2011; 9:53 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Frank Williams  
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Harold Holzer: Why was Abraham Lincoln so silent following his election?

Lincoln’s policy of “masterly inactivity” not only kept him out of trouble during the four-month-long interregnum, it allowed him to work “masterfully” behind the scenes to prevent compromises that would have extended slavery in return for peace ...

By Harold Holzer  | January 10, 2011; 9:50 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Harold Holzer  
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Lonnie Bunch: Why was Abraham Lincoln so silent following his election?

Thirdly, part of Lincoln’s silence was because he recognized that his upcoming inauguration was going to be so important. He wanted to figure out what he should say to try to keep the Union together and to make it clear that ending slavery was not his priority ...

By Lonnie Bunch  | January 10, 2011; 9:47 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Lonnie Bunch  
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Lincoln vs. Jefferson conference in Charleston

For a southern view of the Civil War, consider attending the Stephen Dill Lee Institute annual conference on Feb. 4 and 5 in Charleston, S.C., where the war officially began on April 12, 1861 with the bombardment of Ft. Sumter....

By Linda Wheeler  | January 9, 2011; 10:36 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (3)
Categories:  News  
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