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A House Divided: February 13, 2011 - February 19, 2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Confederate Congress assumes control of Southern troops in Charleston Harbor

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. Follow us. Twitter recap from week one: Showdown in Charleston Week two:...

By Mary Hadar  | February 18, 2011; 4:00 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News, Tweeting the war  
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The Civil War and Black History

Black History Month this year combines an annual celebration of African American history with the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War. This has undoubtedly created a new audience for black history events by drawing...

By Linda Wheeler  | February 18, 2011; 12:45 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Events  
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Photo: President-Elect Lincoln attends reception with Mayor Fernando Wood

President-Elect Lincoln took several days to get from his home of Springfield, Ill., to Washington, making numerous stops and speeches along the way. Here he meets with New York dignitaries at a reception hosted by Mayor Fernando Wood, Feb....

By Mary Hadar  | February 17, 2011; 4:16 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News, Tweeting the war  
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Harold Holzer: How real was the so-called "Baltimore Plot" to kill President-elect Lincoln when he passed through Baltimore en route to Washington?

Scholars have recently shed new and convincing light on the sloppy but determined plot to kill him there before he could become President. As we know from history, it does not take an organized army to murder a leader and change history. ...

By Harold Holzer  | February 14, 2011; 10:38 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Hasrold Holzer  
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Dennis Frye: How real was the so-called "Baltimore Plot" to kill President-elect Lincoln when he passed through Baltimore en route to Washington?

Then the New York Times broke this story—“Design upon Mr. Lincoln’s Life.” The Times unveiled a “fiendish plot” that would have wrecked Lincoln’s train, rolling it down a steep embankment near Baltimore, with assailants murdering any survivors. ...

By Dennis Frye  | February 14, 2011; 10:36 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Dennis Frye  
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Frank Williams: How real was the so-called "Baltimore Plot' to kill President-elect Lincoln when he passed through Baltimore en route to Washington?

The evidence does reveal that a genuine plot existed to assassinate him, thanks to Pinkerton agents and New York City detectives. The plot came from the National Volunteers, a secret group aligned with the anti-Lincoln Knights of the Golden Circle. ...

By Frank Williams  | February 14, 2011; 10:35 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Frank Williams  
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Brag Bowling: How real was the so-called "Baltimore Plot" to kill President-elect Lincoln when he passed through that city en route to Washington?

Maryland had always recognized herself as a Southern state with political and social institutions similar to other southern states. Considering this fact, it was not surprising that the Lincoln train would meet trouble once it crossed the Mason-Dixon Line. ...

By Brag Bowling  | February 14, 2011; 10:30 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (11)
Categories:  Views  | Tags:  Brag Bowling  
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