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A House Divided: February 20, 2011 - February 26, 2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Assassination conspiracy against Lincoln is discovered

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. Follow us. Twitter recap from week one: Showdown in Charleston Week two:...

By Mary Hadar  | February 25, 2011; 5:15 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News, Tweeting the war  
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Great drama at Virginia secession convention

A book with a rather ordinary, academic title—“Showdown in Virginia: The 1861 Convention and the Fate of the Union”—turns out to be a great read. Historians William W. Freehling and Craig M. Simpson researched the four volumes of official convention...

By Linda Wheeler  | February 23, 2011; 6:47 PM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (2)
Categories:  News  
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Brag Bowling: Why did South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas choose to secede?

Tariffs, waning Southern political influence, the rise of the Republican Party were just a few of the issues in addition to slavery and its complex economic and constitutional equation. And slavery, in itself an evil which today is abhorred by every right thinking person, was at that time viewed as a Constitutional right in a nation and world where slavery was generally accepted. ...

By Brag Bowling  | February 22, 2011; 9:45 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (8)
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Frank Williams: Why did South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas choose to secede?

In addition, the haste of secession in South Carolina created a frenzy in the other states with no time to seek alternatives to separation. As Unionist Sam Houston discovered to his dismay in Texas, no quarter was given for secession as there was no time for discussions with “Cooperationists.” ...

By Frank Williams  | February 22, 2011; 9:43 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
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Dennis Frye: Why did South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas choose to secede?,

Southerners witnessed anti-slavery measures make their property illegal in the North; unwelcome in new territories; and denied in new states. Laws pertaining to the return of slave property had been ignored or legislated against--in direct violation of the Constitution (Article 4, Section 2, Clause 3), “thereby annulling a material provision of the compact.” ...

By Dennis Frye  | February 22, 2011; 9:39 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)
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John Marszalek: Why did South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas choose to secede?

The documentary support for the assertion that the major reason that the South seceded was slavery is as solid as any data presented to support any accepted historical reality. It is based on the most primary of primary sources, the reasons given by the seceding states themselves. ...

By John Marszalek  | February 22, 2011; 9:35 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (3)
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Craig Symonds: Why did South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas choose to secede?

Ten weeks later, when Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to restore law and order after Fort Sumter, the eight slave states that had remained in the Union had to choose between coercion and secession. Once again, the numbers tell the story. Those with slave populations over 25% chose to secede; those with slave populations under 20% did not. ...

By Craig Symonds  | February 22, 2011; 9:35 AM ET  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)
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